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Tag: Google

Wireless Display Standards Explained: AirPlay Miracast WiDi Chromecast

HDMI allows you to connect almost any device to a TV or another external display, but HDMI requires a wired connection. You might assume there’d be a well-supported standard for wireless displays, but you’d be wrong.

When it comes to mirroring a device’s screen wirelessly or using it as a remote-control for media displayed on another screen, there is still a wide variety of competing standards fighting it out in the market.

via Wireless Display Standards Explained: AirPlay, Miracast, WiDi, Chromecast, and DLNA.

Chrome App Launcher – All Shortcuts in One Place

It’s no secret around here that Chrome is our browser of choice, and has been for a long time. There are so many great reasons we stick with Google’s browser that we’d need to dedicate an entire article on the virtues of Chrome vs. anything else. Trust me when I say it wouldn’t be a quick read.

The built-in sync process in Chrome for example, which seamlessly keeps all your devices’ browsers current with your latest bookmarks, history and settings…across all  devices and desktop/mobile platforms…is enough to win me over all by itself.  But one of the coolest features in the Chrome browser is the App store, and the ability to add apps to your home page etc., making it really convenient to access things like Tweetdeck, Evernote, Skype, Facebook, Netflix…you name it…as well as shortcuts to Maps , GMail or just about anything. There are literally tons of apps, many of them both free AND useful, in the Chrome App store.

chromeapplauncher01

Google Chrome apps blur the lines between actual apps and shortcuts to web pages. Some are true apps, while others are a convenient shortcut to regular web content like GMail or Maps. Either way, the launch page makes it easy to create and customize your own personalized launcher with all of your favorite apps and websites in one place.

Chrome App Launcher takes it one step further, by giving you an “Apps” shortcut right on your toolbar, as well as the ability to set the Apps page as your Home page. My favorite feature is the ability to add the Apps shortcut to your Windows Taskbar, making most of my Chrome shortcuts just 2 clicks away.

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You can create a shortcut on your Windows Task Bar really easily. Well, actually all you have to do is install any Desktop App from the Chrome App Store, and Google automatically adds a shortcut on your Task Bar (and Start Menu, inside the Google Chrome folder) for you! The instructions are right below.

Visit the Chrome App store right after you install Chrome (if you haven’t already) and check out all of the free (and not so free) apps available that help make the Chrome experience our ongoing recommendation for trouble free, high performance browsing.

Of course, keep checking back here for more tips on how to make IT get out of your way and start working for you instead!

App Launcher

The Chrome App Launcher is a window where you can quickly access all of your Chrome apps right from your desktop. You can open App Launcher from your Taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac).

Install App Launcher

App Launcher installs automatically when you add an app from the “For Your Desktop” collection of the Chrome Web Store. Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to the For Your Desktop section of the Chrome Web Store.
  2. Add an app by clicking the Free or Buy for [price] button.
  3. Look in your taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac) to find App Launcher .

When you open App Launcher, you’ll find the app you just added, as well as some other handy Chrome apps.

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital – Wired

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | WIRED.

Starbucks as workplace: How’s your work-life balance in the mobile age?  Global X/Flickr

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | via WIRED

Google. Evernote. Wunderlist. Mailbox. Dropbox. GoToMeeting. The newest wave of apps is all about leveraging the right tools to help you get things done across multi-screen. This proliferation of mobile technology has promised liberation for today’s workforce. So why do we feel more chained to our work than ever?

Nearly 1.3 billion (yes, billion) people now work untethered from their desks, and organizations are getting serious about keeping this new distributed workforce connected and productive with tools that support with mobility and collaboration.

The arrival of the mobile workforce has given many entrepreneurs the hope that they will be able to find some time for life outside of work. But with time as the ultimate commodity in today’s increasingly busy world, the work-life balance that many seek is still more of an illusion than reality.

We should be at a point where we can spend our Sunday afternoon playing catch with our kids, instead of wasting hours sifting through emails to get a handle on where our business stands. Or have time to go out and meet with prospective clients and make deals that will grow our business, instead of being bogged down and overwhelmed while pulling all of the pieces together.

So why is this still a problem in a time when we have more productivity tools and technologies than ever before? Because all of our tools are entirely disconnected, and its contributing to our ever more fragmented workflows. We’ve put too much of an emphasis on our email as a productivity tool, with the hopes that new productivity management and content sharing tools from Google Docs to Asana will pick up the slack where email fails.

But that’s not happening. Workers are still spending 28% of their office time on emails daily, which amounts to more than 650 hours a year and 13 hours a week.

Microsoft, Apple and Google have tried to solve this information overload, with more than half of the workforce stating that they are demoralized when they can’t manage all the information that comes their way each day, but have ultimately failed to create a solution that enables everyone, from the small business owner to the corporate manager, to get their work done faster and more efficiently.
The tools that we turn to for personal productivity have made the shift from web to multi-screen and while they are useful, they are not transformative. Why? Because they are all great at doing one thing — but don’t talk to each other.

Ultimately, we’ve gotten away from the simplicity of work. No one should have to open 5-6 different tools, email, Google Docs, GoToMeeting, Dropbox, Basecamp, Evernote and the myriad of other tools we use, in order to get an update on just one project. All of these tools have become somewhat counterproductive as only 2 percent of us can actually multitask between all of them and because more than 50% of us are now spending more time trying to be productive than actually working.

In trying to make things simpler we’ve only diminished productivity, which combined with wasted time, negatively affects the bottom line.

So how do we solve this snowballing productivity problem? We need all of these software tools to work together as one, creating a digital E Pluribus Unum.

By approaching the productivity problem from a position of connectivity, our workflow immediately becomes more efficient because our tools are working for us, and doing the information sifting and organizing so that we don’t have to.

For example, CEOs should not be copied so often that they have 300 emails coming through their inbox each day. This system makes email another job that managers don’t have time for, and ultimately defeats the purpose of email as a tool for communication.

However, if email, project management, meetings, documents, notes, etc. are all unified in one place, CEOs can utilize the time they used to spend searching for the latest email update to actually get something done.

Working on the go can also be as productive as working at your desk if you’re able to access apps in a single connected place that doesn’t require opening and closing different programs constantly in order to complete one task on a phone or tablet. At the end of the day, everyone needs to be able to see it all at a glance when out of the office, whether we’re at the kitchen table or on the train.

Technology has helped us break the chains and free ourselves from being stuck at a desk all day, and now its time to keep track of what really matters when it comes to working efficiently — context and clarity.

We have realized how fragmented and disconnected our workflows have become, now its time to reconnect.

Steven Berlin is co-founder and CEO of Uskape.

Originally posted by:

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5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now.

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

According to the Daily Dot, nearly 5 million usernames and passwords to Gmail accounts have been leaked on a Russian Bitcoin forum. Here’s what you should know.

The list has since been taken down, and there’s no evidence that Gmail itself was hacked—just that these passwords have been leaked. Most sources are saying that lots of the information is quite old, so chances are they were leaked long ago—though others are claiming 60% of the passwords are still valid (not to mention really, really horrible).

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

To check if your password was one of the leaked, plug your Gmail address into this tool (which also checks against recent Yandex and Mail.ru leaks). If you’re paranoid, you may also want to change your password at this time. As always, make sure you use a strong password and enable two-factor authentication on  your account. Hit the link to read more.

Update: Looks like the IsLeaked tool is having some trouble due to unusually high traffic—if you get an error message, try reloading the page or checking back later.

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked to Russian Bitcoin Forum | The Daily Dot

First Google Glass Detector | Coming Soon| WIRED

For Sale Soon: The World’s First Google Glass Detector | Threat Level | WIRED.

Cyborg Unplug, a gadget no bigger than a laptop charger that plugs into a wall and patrols the local Wi-Fi network for connected Google Glass devices, along with other potential surveillance gadgets like Google Dropcams, Wi-Fi-enabled drone copters, and certain wireless microphones.

THE PLUG CAN SEEK OUT AND DISCONNECT NEARBY SURVEILLANCE DEVICES ON ANY NETWORK IT CONNECTS TO—A MORE LEGALLY AMBIGUOUS USE OF THE GADGET.

“Basically it’s a wireless defense shield for your home or place of work,” says Oliver. “The intent is to counter a growing and tangibly troubling emergence of wirelessly capable devices that are used and abused for surveillance and voyeurism.”

Our Opinion: Just Don’t be a Glasshole

 

Get Around Hotel Wi-Fi Blocks and Use Your Chromecast When Traveling

Get Around Hotel Wi-Fi Blocks and Use Your Chromecast When Traveling.

I love my Chromecast. But since I haven’t traveled with it (yet), I didn’t even think about the fact that you wouldn’t be able to use it in a lot of motels/hotels. A travel router is a great solution as the author of the source article points out.

A tethering plan and a mobile device that supports 4G tethering would also work…but unless you have an unlimited data plan, Netflix would probably burn through your data plan in a couple nights. I’m wondering how many nights I could get away with per month on my “unlimited” plan and carrier-free tethering, thanks to my fully unlocked Nexus device 😉

SSsshh don’t let AT&T find out #BigMother

 

Mirror any Android screen on your PC

We’ve been playing around with Google’s Chromecast a little bit, and the first take has been excellent. You can use it to play all kinds of content: YouTube videos, Netflix and any other Chromecast enabled app, as well as sending “casting” the entire screen to any TV with an HDMI port. Very, cool stuff really. Screencasting is especially cool because it allows the full Android experience on your TV…your Android device basically becomes the remote control touchpad for a 42″ Android Display.  Like I said: Very, VERY cool.

We just found out about AllCast, and haven’t had a chance to test it yet. But at this point it seems to have many of the same capabilities as Chromecast…but instead of going to your TV, you mirror to your PC.  Casting your Android screen to your PC seems like it would be pretty cool…maybe even more cool than going to a TV, so I can’t wait to give it a test.

But don’t wait for me to get around to doing a full review (and I’m not suggesting that I ever will)…that could take way too much time. And by ‘time’ I mean…well just think of time from glacial perspective. But if you have an Android phone you can give it a try yourself…today!

Check out the Engadget article for more info, and if you have a late model Android phone, head over to the Google Play Store, grab the free app, and start casting!

Engadget: AllCast will let you mirror any Android phone’s screen on your PC.

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Net Neutrality – Bravo Mr. President

Tech Companies Praise The President For Speaking Out In Favor Of Net Neutrality | TechCrunch.

President Barack Obama spoke in favor of net neutrality this week. Finally.

One of the issues around net neutrality is whether you are creating different rates or charges for different content providers. That’s the big controversy here. So you have big, wealthy media companies who might be willing to pay more and also charge more for spectrum, more bandwidth on the Internet so they can stream movies faster.

I personally, the position of my administration, as well as a lot of the companies here, is that you don’t want to start getting a differentiation in how accessible the Internet is to different users. You want to leave it open so the next Google and the next Facebook can succeed.

That’s correct. Bravo Mr. President.

Tech Companies Praise The President For Speaking Out In Favor Of Net Neutrality | TechCrunch

Microsoft will kill support for IE 8, the world’s most popular desktop browser, by 2016 | VentureBeat | Business | by Harrison Weber

Microsoft will kill support for IE 8, the world’s most popular desktop browser, by 2016 | VentureBeat | Business | by Harrison Weber.

They can kill support, but can they make you people who are still using a 4 year defunct browser upgrade…or better yet, switch?  #Chrome

Microsoft will kill support for IE 8, the world's most popular desktop browser, by 2016 | VentureBeat | Business | by Harrison Weber