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The Most Controversial Hacking Cases of the Past Decade

The Most Controversial Hacking Cases of the Past Decade

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, also known as the federal anti-hacking statute, has been used to prosecute a growing list of non-hacking behavior.

The post The Most Controversial Hacking Cases of the Past Decade appeared first on WIRED.

Matthew Keys’ Hacking Conviction May Not Survive an Appeal

Matthew Keys’ Hacking Conviction May Not Survive an Appeal

The conviction of Matthew Keys on hacking charges this week has renewed focus on a controversial law that many say prosecutors are using incorrectly to inflate cases.

The post Matthew Keys’ Hacking Conviction May Not Survive an Appeal appeared first on WIRED.

Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle

Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle

The hacker breach of the Office of Personnel Management, exposing four million government employees’ data, is far worse than it looked when it first hit the public eye.

The post Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle appeared first on WIRED.

Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle

Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle

The hacker breach of the Office of Personnel Management, exposing four million government employees’ data, is far worse than it looked when it first hit the public eye.

The post Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle appeared first on WIRED.

Aspiring Singer Arrested in Israel on Suspicion of Hacking Madonna

Aspiring Singer Arrested in Israel on Suspicion of Hacking Madonna

The specific hackers behind the Sony breach and data leaks may never be identified or arrested. But authorities say they have caught a hacker behind another high-profile breach: the intrusion into computers owned by Madonna, which resulted in leaks of her songs before their scheduled release. The Israeli suspect, 39-year-old Adi Lederman, was arrested in […]

The post Aspiring Singer Arrested in Israel on Suspicion of Hacking Madonna appeared first on WIRED.

Email Spoofing: Explained (and How to Protect Yourself)

Jason P. Stadtlander Headshot, Huffington Post

Recently a co-worker asked me “Why do people even bother to spoof my email address?”

First, for those of you joining me that have no idea what the term spoofing means – let us examine that.

Spoofing is defined as:

/spo͞of/
verb
1. imitate (something) while exaggerating its characteristic features for comic effect.
2. hoax or trick (someone).

Origin: late 19th century English comedian Arthur Roberts.

In the context of computers, to spoof one’s email address means that the sender is acting as if the email is coming from someone it is not.

How someone (or something) sends an email made to look like it comes from somewhere or somewhere it does not, is a little more technical to explain. So, if you don’t like tech talk, then skip to the next section “Why is my email address being spoofed?”

How are they spoofing me?

Spoofing email addresses is rather easy. All a person needs to spoof an email address is an SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) server (a server that can send email) and the appropriate email software. Most website hosting services will even provide an SMTP server in their hosting package. It is also possible to send email from your own computer if you load an SMTP server on it, however most ISPs will block port 25 (which is required to send out email).

Many of the available free SMTP servers will allow you to show a different “from” address than the actual registered domain that the email is transmitting from. However, to the recipient of said message, they will see that it actually came from the address you specified.

Now, there are special checks in place (and more being put into place) to prevent exactly this problem. One is called SPF or “Sender Policy Framework” which was developed by Meng Weng Wong in 2003. Basically, each time an email is sent, the receiving server compares the IP of the origin with the IP listed in the SPF record with the appropriate domain.

EXAMPLE 1: So, for example, let’s say someone tried to spoof Bill Gates (billgates@microsoft.com):
They would send an email on his behalf > the recipient server would then talk back to microsoft.com and say “Hey, I have an email that is coming from 123.123.123.123 stating that it was sent from billgates@microsoft.com.” > microsoft.com would then tell the recipient server, “No, sorry, it should be coming from 111.111.111.111.” and the message would never get delivered.

Why is my email address being spoofed?

Two basic reasons people (and machines) spoof:

1. Malicious: To cause useless internet traffic – ultimately hoping to bog down servers or bring them to a halt.

2. Because you were unlucky enough to have clicked the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Continue reading Email Spoofing: Explained on Huffington Post The Blog

Email Spoofing: Explained (and How to Protect Yourself) | Jason P. Stadtlander

Microsoft releases 14 patches for Windows

bug-162019

Microsoft released patches for 14 vulnerabilities in its Windows operating system, Office and Internet Explorer software on Tuesday, including four it deemed critical, it’s highest severity rating.

All four of the critical bugs could allow attackers to remotely execute programs on a targeted system, something that in the past has allowed hackers to steal personal information such as passwords or take over machines for the purpose of sending spam.

The patches were released as part of the company’s monthly “patch Tuesdaysecurity update for its major software products. The company had originally planned to deliver 16 updates Tuesday, but two are marked as yet to appear. They include one that was expected to carry a critical rating.

At 14, the number of patches is a monthly record for 2013 and 2014.

They include a problem with Windows Object Linking and Embedding that could allow remote code execution if the user visits a website containing malicious code. If the user is logged in as the administrator, the attacker could gain the ability to install programs and change and delete data. A related patch for Internet Explorer fixes the vulnerability with malicious websites and 16 other problems with the software, said Microsoft.

A security update for the Microsoft Secure Channel software in Windows fixes a problem that leaves Windows Server vulnerable to attack from specially crafted packets. The fourth critical patch fixes a hole in Windows that allows attackers to invoke Microsoft XML Core Services from a malicious website and then remotely execute code on a target system.

A further seven patches are marked as important—the second highest rank.

One vulnerability in Microsoft Office allows for remote execution of code, four additional problems allow attackers to assign themselves higher privileges and two allow bypass of certain security features in Windows.

via Microsoft releases 14 patches for Windows security problems | PCWorld.

Article: 5 steps to keep your accounts safe from hackers and scammers

Throughout the flood of hacks and data breaches at retailers, restaurants, health care providers and online companies this year — Home Depot, Target, Subway, Adobe and eBay were just a handful — the one safe haven was the banks. Unlike other companies, banks had a long history of keeping bad guys away from our money and personal data.

Unfortunately, that’s no longer something we can take for granted, as JPMorgan Chase customers discovered recently when the financial giant admitted that hackers had stolen information, including checking and savings account details, from 80 million customers. Even worse, the hack went on for two months before the company noticed anything was amiss. That’s not very comforting.

There’s no way you can prevent a data breach from occurring at a company that has your business. You can, however, make sure your accounts are secure from other forms of attack.

Here are my Top 5 methods to maintain safe and secure online accounts.

1. Lock down your password

Maintaining good password security is one of the easiest ways to protect your accounts.

A strong password — eight or more characters with upper-case characters, lower-case characters, numbers and symbols in a random order — is very hard for hackers to break. Click here to learn how to create a password like this that’s still easy to remember.

Of course, you need to create a unique password for every account. That way, if hackers get one of your passwords in a data breach, they can’t immediately get into your other accounts.

While you’re making your passwords strong, don’t forget to beef up your security questions, too. A strong password is worthless if a hacker can answer your security question after a quick trip to Facebook.

2. Secure your connection

When logging into a sensitive account, the best place to do it is at home. I’m assuming here that you’ve followed my other security tips about securing your network and making sure your computer doesn’t have a data-stealing virus.

Of course, in an emergency, you might need to connect to a sensitive account when you’re on the go. For banking, it’s best to use your bank’s app and a cellular connection.

If you have to use Wi-Fi, add extra security with a Virtual Private Network. This creates a secure, encrypted link with a third-party server, and you access your sites through that link. It’s an extra level of protection that hackers shouldn’t be able to crack. On a laptop, CyberGhost is a good option. On a tablet or smartphone, check out Hotspot Shield VPN or avast! SecureLine VPN.

Know that VPNs slow down your Internet speed. Turn them off for streaming videos and general browsing.

3. Set up account alerts

Many banks will automatically send you text alerts when purchases or withdrawals on your card exceed an amount that you specify. Click here to learn more about setting up text alerts. Check your credit cards and other accounts for similar options.

Many online accounts also offer something called two-step verification, or two-factor authentication. This is great. In order to log in from an unfamiliar device or location, you need a password and a code from a separate email account or smartphone text.

Click here for instructions on setting up two-step verification for Microsoft, Facebook, Google and other online accounts. It takes just a few minutes and can save you a bunch of time and hassles.

While we’re on the subject of two-factor authentication, some banks now feature an embedded chip that generates a new pass code for every use. Ask your financial institution if it offers cards with Chip Authentication Program (CAP) or Dynamic Passcode Authentication (DPA) technology. They don’t advertise this. You have to know to ask.

4. Avoid phishing scams

Even if hackers don’t get your credit card information or account number, they usually get the next best thing: Your name and email address.

That’s exactly what they need to launch a phishing attack. A popular type of phishing attack is a fake email claiming to be from a real company that asks you to click on a link or download an attachment.

Thanks to data breaches, hackers know exactly what companies you use. You might get an email claiming to be from JPMorgan Chase telling you that your account has a problem and you need to click a link or download a file for more details. Click here to learn the warning signs of a phishing email so you aren’t fooled.

Of course, the link will take you to a malicious site disguised as a Chase page, or the email attachment will contain a data-stealing virus. Either way, hackers can get your username and password, or other sensitive information.

Remember, no legitimate company will ask you to click a link or download an email attachment to update your account details.

5. Be vigilant

The best way to make sure your online banking account, or any other account, stays safe is to pay attention. Catching small problems early can prevent hackers from making bigger ones later. Here’s why:

In the cybercriminal world there’s a term, “fullz.” A fullz is all the information a thief needs to assume the identity of someone else and apply for credit under their name.

When hackers get your fullz, they often group it with fullz from other people and sell the whole package online. Click here to learn more about fullz and how they’re bought and sold.

After buying a fullz, a criminal will test the waters. He’ll place a few small-scale purchases using your account details. If you don’t take any action, he’ll continue making small purchases until he’s earned the amount he paid for your “fullz,” and then some.

Finally, the criminal will max out your card or drain your account without a second thought. How do you stop this? Watch your accounts. If you notice a strange transaction, call your bank or credit card company immediately. Better to err on the side of caution.

Copyright 2014, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

On the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show, Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com. Kim also posts breaking tech news 24/7 at News.Komando.com

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/11/01/5-steps-to-keep-your-accounts-safe-from-hackers-and-scammers/

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