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Google Voice update gives app a welcome refresh

Google Voice sometimes feels like the forgotten service in Google’s portfolio, but a new app update has given the calling service a quick refresh. Launched on iOS with an update this week, the new app won’t blow anybody away with its new functionality, but it does make using Google Voice a little easier if it’s your primary voice call system. … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/google-voice-update-gives-app-a-welcome-refresh-14541147/

Firefox now supports the newest internet security protocol

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Last Friday, the Internet Engineering Task Force released the final version of TLS 1.3. This is a major update to TLS 1.2, the security protocol that secures much of the web by, among other things, providing the layer that handles the encryption of every HTTPS connection.

The updated spec promises improved security and a bit more speed, thanks to the reduced need for round trips as the browser and server negotiate the security settings. And the good news is, you can already use it today, because, as Mozilla today announced, Firefox already supports the new standard out of the box. Chrome, too, started supporting the new protocol (based on earlier drafts) in version 65.

TLS 1.3 has been a few years in the making and it’s been 10 years since the last version launched. It’s no secret that TLS 1.2 had its share of problems — though those were mostly due to its implementations, which are obviously a favorite target for hackers thanks to their ubiquity and which opened up bugs like the infamous Heartbleed vulnerability. But in addition to that, some of the algorithms that are part of TLS 1.2 have been successfully attacked.

It’s no surprise, then, that TLS 1.3 focuses on providing access to modern cryptographic methods (the folks over at Cloudflare have a more in-depth look at what exactly that means).

For users, all of this ideally means that they get access to a more secure web, as well as a slightly faster one, as the new protocol allows the browser and server to quickly negotiate which encryption to use without lots of back and forth.

Some of the companies that already support TLS 1.3 include Facebook (which says that it already serves almost half of its traffic over the new protocol), as well as Google and Cloudflare.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/KhhKT6MRq0s/

What the rumors say about Google’s upcoming Pixel 3

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Now that the Note 9’s all good and official, it’s time to move onto the next major smartphone. The Google Pixel 3 leaks haven’t quite hit the fever pitch we saw with Samsung’s device ahead of launch — though there’s still time. After all, it seems likely the latest version of Google’s flagship Android handset won’t officially be official until October.

Even so, we’ve already seen a handful of credible links, including a full unboxing last week, so we’re starting to develop a pretty good picture of what we’re in for with the device.

For starters, there’s what looks to be a pretty sizable top notch. That Google would embrace the notch this time around is no surprise, really. In additional to being all the rage on practically every non-Samsung flagship, Google made a big deal of making Android Pie notch-friendly.

It seems to follow, then, that the company would embrace the polarizing design decision. That said, even by today’s notch-embracing standards, this is a big one. If anything, it seems that notches are actually getting bigger since Essential helped kickstart the trend by adding one to its first phone.

Speaking of embracing trends, Google dropped the headphone jack for the Pixel 2, after mocking Apple’s decision to do so a year prior. From the looks of it, the company is helping ease the transition with a pair of USB-C headphones, forgoing the necessity for a dongle (there does, however, still appear to be one in the box). Of course, you’ll still have to figure out a way to listen to music while charging the phone.

The design language is very similar to the company’s Pixel Buds, complete with loops for keeping them in place. It’s probably going too far to call them wired Pixel Buds, with all of the functionality that entails (translation and the like), but the company does appear to be taking some cues from the lukewarmly received wireless earbuds.

The Google Pixel XL, meanwhile, appears to be going really large this time out. The new 6.4-inch Note 9’s got nothing on what’s reported to be a 6.7-inch display. We’re getting to the point where these things are basically tablets with calling capabilities. Of course, Samsung’s got the benefit of years of product design that have made it possible to sneak a large display into a relatively small footprint. Without actually holding the new device, it’s hard to say how unwieldy it really is.

Other bits and bobs include a Snapdragon 845, which is basically a prerequisite for any flagship smartphone to be taken seriously. The XL is also rumored to have a 3,430 mAh battery — actually a downgrade over last year’s model, in spite of yet another massive bump in screen size.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/IKeFXHO9EzU/

Samsung SmartThings Wifi: 5 things you should know

Samsung wants to tame your smart home and end your WiFi deadspots, with its new SmartThings Wifi mesh router system. Promising not only smoother internet access for things like online gaming, streaming media, and general browsing, the mesh networking system also integrates an IoT hub that could leave you spending less time jumping between apps and more time letting your … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/samsung-smartthings-wifi-5-things-you-should-know-13541071/

What SD Card Do I Need for My Camera?

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Modern digital cameras all write the photos and videos you take to removable storage cards, but which ones do you need? Let’s look at which SD cards—and CompactFlash, CFast, or XQD cards—are right for you.

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/362177/what-sd-card-do-i-need-for-my-camera/

What is a DMG File (And How Do I Use One)?

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DMG files are containers for apps in macOS. You open them, drag the app to your Applications folder, and then eject them, saving you the hassle of the dreaded “Install Wizard” of most Windows apps. So if all they are is a folder for an app, why do we use them instead of just downloading the app itself?

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/362166/what-is-a-dmg-file-and-how-do-i-use-one/

‘Fallout 76’ deals with trolls by making them part of the game

fallout-76-allies.jpgWhen Bethesda mentioned that Fallout 76 was an online game, you could hear alarm bells ringing in fans’ heads. How were they going to deal with the inevitable trolls who come in to ruin other players’ fun? Now we know: it’s making them a part of th…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2018/08/11/fallout-76-anti-troll-gameplay/

Hacking the websites responsible for election information is so easy an 11 year-old did it

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It’s time to talk about election security.

Over the weekend at Def Con, the annual hacker convention in Las Vegas to discuss some of the latest and greatest (or scariest) trends in the wild world of hacking, a pair of election security hacking demonstrations set up for adults and kids alike offered up some frightening revelations about America’s voting infrastructure. (I’m not even going to begin to touch Voatz.)

For 11 year-old Emmett from Austin, hacking the website for the Florida Secretary of State was as easy as a simple SQL injection.

While it took Emmett only 10 minutes to break into the election reporting section of the Florida Secretary of State web page, it’s important to note that these pages were set up as replicas.

The idea, according to event organizers from Wickr (a secure communications platform), “was mainly focused on breaking into the portions of the websites that are critical to the election process, [so] the kids worked against the replicas of the webpages where election results are reported by secretaries of state.”

The replicas were built by the team at Wall of Sheep Village and they issued the following statement: “The main issues with the live sites we are creating the replicas of are related to poor coding practices. They have popped up across the industry and are not vendor specific.”

And while the National Association for the Secretaries of State had some choice words for the Voting Machine Hacking Village, they didn’t address the hacks the kids made on their actual web sites.

Well this is interesting. National Association of Secretaries of State issues statement against the Def Con Voting Village. Says its attempt to recreate (and likely hack the shit out of) a connected mockup of the election process isn’t realistic. pic.twitter.com/c1uy694UPA

— Kevin Collier (@kevincollier) August 9, 2018

In all, some 47 kids participated in the election hacking contest and 89% of them managed to get in to the virtual web sites set up by Wickr and Wall of Sheep Village.

Emmett, whose dad works in cybersecurity and who has been attending Def Con now for four years, has some thoughts on how easy it was for him to get into the system and change the vote tallies for election results.

“It’s actually kind of scary,” the 11 year-old said. “People can easily hack in to websites like these and they can probably do way more harmful things to these types of websites.”

The point, according to Wickr’s (badass) founder Nico Sell, is to bring attention to just how flawed security operations remain at the state level in areas that are vital to the nation’s democracy.

“The really important reason why we’re doing this is because we’re not taking the problem serious enough how significantly someone can mess with our elections,” said Sell. “And by showing this with eight year old kids we can call attention to the problem in such a way that we can fix the system so our democracy isn’t ruined.”

Some executives at big corporations share the same concerns. For Hugh Thompson, the chief technology officer at Symantec, the risks are real — even if the problems won’t manifest in the most important elections.

As Thompson (who worked on election security in the early 2000s) told The Financial Times, “The risk that I think most of us worried about at that time is still the biggest one: someone goes into a state or a county that doesn’t really matter in the grand scheme of the election, is not going to change the balance on x, y or z, but then publishes details of the attack,” he said. “Undermining confidence in the vote is scary.”

Stakes are incredibly high, according to experts familiar with election security. Despite the indictments that Robert Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russian interference, issued against 12 Russian nationals for targeting the 2016 US election, Russian hacking remains a threat in the current election cycle.

Microsoft has already said that it has detected evidence of attempted Russian interference into three campaigns already in the 2018 election cycle.

As Fortune reported in July, Microsoft’s vice president for customer security, said that researchers at the company had discovered phishing campaigns that were linked to the GRU, the Russian military intelligence unit tied to the DNC election hacks from 2016.

For security officers working on the websites for the secretaries of state in the battleground states that the tween and teen hackers targeted during Def Con, young Emmett has some advice.

“Use more protection. Upgrade your security and obviously test your own websites against some of the common vulnerabilities,” the 11 year-old advised. 

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/0cTCETwqqYI/

To Identify a Hacker, Treat Them Like a Burglar

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A preliminary study shows that hackers penetrate systems in unique, documentable ways—just like criminals in the physical world.

Source: https://www.wired.com/story/case-linkage-hacker-attribution-cybersecurity

How to Properly Check Your Internet Speed

Speed-featured.jpgIf there is one thing that is consistently taken for granted by the majority of people, it’s internet speed. When it’s fast, we never give it a second thought. When it’s slow, we’re pulling our hair out. The question is what can you do about it? Unplug the router and plug it back in? It’s not a bad suggestion. After all, it worked in South Park. It’s not uncommon for virtually everyone to experience some slow down in internet speed at one point or another. However if you are suffering from frequent slowdowns or interruptions, you’re going to want to find out the root cause… Read more

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Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/properly-check-internet-speed/

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