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Category: Google (page 1 of 2)

Google’s Three Tips for Sabotaging the Cybercrime Economy

Google’s Three Tips for Sabotaging the Cybercrime Economy

In a broad study, a team of Googlers and academic researchers suggest attacking the cybercrime supply chain.

The post Google’s Three Tips for Sabotaging the Cybercrime Economy appeared first on WIRED.

Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails

Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails

Tech companies are competing like never before for privacy bragging rights. In that race, Google may have just slipped, and WhatsApp faceplanted at the starting line.

The post Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails appeared first on WIRED.

Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails

Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails

Tech companies are competing like never before for privacy bragging rights. In that race, Google may have just slipped, and WhatsApp faceplanted at the starting line.

The post Rating Tech Giants on Privacy: Google Slips, WhatsApp Fails appeared first on WIRED.

Chrome Can Now Warn Users Who Type Gmail Passwords in Dumb Places

Chrome Can Now Warn Users Who Type Gmail Passwords in Dumb Places

On Wednesday, Google released a new extension for Chrome it calls Password Alert.

The post Chrome Can Now Warn Users Who Type Gmail Passwords in Dumb Places appeared first on WIRED.

Googlers’ Epic Hack Exploits How Memory Leaks Electricity

Googlers’ Epic Hack Exploits How Memory Leaks Electricity

Google’s hack shows a fundamental flaw in basic computer hardware that could be impossible to fully patch in existing vulnerable computers.

The post Googlers’ Epic Hack Exploits How Memory Leaks Electricity appeared first on WIRED.

DARPA Is Developing a Search Engine for the Dark Web

DARPA Is Developing a Search Engine for the Dark Web

A new search engine being developed by DARPA aims to shine a light on the dark web and uncover patterns and relationships in online data to help law enforcement and others track illegal activity. The project, dubbed Memex, has been in the works for a year and is being developed by 17 different contractor teams […]

The post DARPA Is Developing a Search Engine for the Dark Web appeared first on WIRED.

Chrome App Launcher – All Shortcuts in One Place

It’s no secret around here that Chrome is our browser of choice, and has been for a long time. There are so many great reasons we stick with Google’s browser that we’d need to dedicate an entire article on the virtues of Chrome vs. anything else. Trust me when I say it wouldn’t be a quick read.

The built-in sync process in Chrome for example, which seamlessly keeps all your devices’ browsers current with your latest bookmarks, history and settings…across all  devices and desktop/mobile platforms…is enough to win me over all by itself.  But one of the coolest features in the Chrome browser is the App store, and the ability to add apps to your home page etc., making it really convenient to access things like Tweetdeck, Evernote, Skype, Facebook, Netflix…you name it…as well as shortcuts to Maps , GMail or just about anything. There are literally tons of apps, many of them both free AND useful, in the Chrome App store.

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Google Chrome apps blur the lines between actual apps and shortcuts to web pages. Some are true apps, while others are a convenient shortcut to regular web content like GMail or Maps. Either way, the launch page makes it easy to create and customize your own personalized launcher with all of your favorite apps and websites in one place.

Chrome App Launcher takes it one step further, by giving you an “Apps” shortcut right on your toolbar, as well as the ability to set the Apps page as your Home page. My favorite feature is the ability to add the Apps shortcut to your Windows Taskbar, making most of my Chrome shortcuts just 2 clicks away.

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You can create a shortcut on your Windows Task Bar really easily. Well, actually all you have to do is install any Desktop App from the Chrome App Store, and Google automatically adds a shortcut on your Task Bar (and Start Menu, inside the Google Chrome folder) for you! The instructions are right below.

Visit the Chrome App store right after you install Chrome (if you haven’t already) and check out all of the free (and not so free) apps available that help make the Chrome experience our ongoing recommendation for trouble free, high performance browsing.

Of course, keep checking back here for more tips on how to make IT get out of your way and start working for you instead!

App Launcher

The Chrome App Launcher is a window where you can quickly access all of your Chrome apps right from your desktop. You can open App Launcher from your Taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac).

Install App Launcher

App Launcher installs automatically when you add an app from the “For Your Desktop” collection of the Chrome Web Store. Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to the For Your Desktop section of the Chrome Web Store.
  2. Add an app by clicking the Free or Buy for [price] button.
  3. Look in your taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac) to find App Launcher .

When you open App Launcher, you’ll find the app you just added, as well as some other handy Chrome apps.

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital – Wired

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | WIRED.

Starbucks as workplace: How’s your work-life balance in the mobile age?  Global X/Flickr

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | via WIRED

Google. Evernote. Wunderlist. Mailbox. Dropbox. GoToMeeting. The newest wave of apps is all about leveraging the right tools to help you get things done across multi-screen. This proliferation of mobile technology has promised liberation for today’s workforce. So why do we feel more chained to our work than ever?

Nearly 1.3 billion (yes, billion) people now work untethered from their desks, and organizations are getting serious about keeping this new distributed workforce connected and productive with tools that support with mobility and collaboration.

The arrival of the mobile workforce has given many entrepreneurs the hope that they will be able to find some time for life outside of work. But with time as the ultimate commodity in today’s increasingly busy world, the work-life balance that many seek is still more of an illusion than reality.

We should be at a point where we can spend our Sunday afternoon playing catch with our kids, instead of wasting hours sifting through emails to get a handle on where our business stands. Or have time to go out and meet with prospective clients and make deals that will grow our business, instead of being bogged down and overwhelmed while pulling all of the pieces together.

So why is this still a problem in a time when we have more productivity tools and technologies than ever before? Because all of our tools are entirely disconnected, and its contributing to our ever more fragmented workflows. We’ve put too much of an emphasis on our email as a productivity tool, with the hopes that new productivity management and content sharing tools from Google Docs to Asana will pick up the slack where email fails.

But that’s not happening. Workers are still spending 28% of their office time on emails daily, which amounts to more than 650 hours a year and 13 hours a week.

Microsoft, Apple and Google have tried to solve this information overload, with more than half of the workforce stating that they are demoralized when they can’t manage all the information that comes their way each day, but have ultimately failed to create a solution that enables everyone, from the small business owner to the corporate manager, to get their work done faster and more efficiently.
The tools that we turn to for personal productivity have made the shift from web to multi-screen and while they are useful, they are not transformative. Why? Because they are all great at doing one thing — but don’t talk to each other.

Ultimately, we’ve gotten away from the simplicity of work. No one should have to open 5-6 different tools, email, Google Docs, GoToMeeting, Dropbox, Basecamp, Evernote and the myriad of other tools we use, in order to get an update on just one project. All of these tools have become somewhat counterproductive as only 2 percent of us can actually multitask between all of them and because more than 50% of us are now spending more time trying to be productive than actually working.

In trying to make things simpler we’ve only diminished productivity, which combined with wasted time, negatively affects the bottom line.

So how do we solve this snowballing productivity problem? We need all of these software tools to work together as one, creating a digital E Pluribus Unum.

By approaching the productivity problem from a position of connectivity, our workflow immediately becomes more efficient because our tools are working for us, and doing the information sifting and organizing so that we don’t have to.

For example, CEOs should not be copied so often that they have 300 emails coming through their inbox each day. This system makes email another job that managers don’t have time for, and ultimately defeats the purpose of email as a tool for communication.

However, if email, project management, meetings, documents, notes, etc. are all unified in one place, CEOs can utilize the time they used to spend searching for the latest email update to actually get something done.

Working on the go can also be as productive as working at your desk if you’re able to access apps in a single connected place that doesn’t require opening and closing different programs constantly in order to complete one task on a phone or tablet. At the end of the day, everyone needs to be able to see it all at a glance when out of the office, whether we’re at the kitchen table or on the train.

Technology has helped us break the chains and free ourselves from being stuck at a desk all day, and now its time to keep track of what really matters when it comes to working efficiently — context and clarity.

We have realized how fragmented and disconnected our workflows have become, now its time to reconnect.

Steven Berlin is co-founder and CEO of Uskape.

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