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Category: Government

FCC’s net neutrality ruling gets pushback from big tech’s lobbying group


The net neutrality fight rages on, and now tech’s big lobbying group is signing on. 

The Internet Association — a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying group that represents Google, Facebook, Netflix, Uber, and dozens of other tech companies on public policy issues — filed a motion to intervene against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruling on net neutrality. 

“The internet industry will continue to fight for net neutrality protections that help consumers, foster innovation, and promote competition for the entire online ecosystem,” Internet Association President and CEO Michael Beckerman said in a statement.  Read more…

More about Facebook, Netflix, Uber, Silicon Valley, and Net Neutrality


Ether plunges after SEC says “dozens” of ICO investigations underway


Enlarge (credit: BTC Keychain)

The price of ether, the cryptocurrency of the Ethereum network, has fallen below $500 for the first time this year. The decline comes days after a senior official from the Securities and Exchange Commission acknowledged that the agency had “dozens” of open investigations into initial coin offerings. The price of ether has fallen 19 percent in the last 24 hours, from $580 to $470.

“We’re doing obviously a lot in the crypto space, and we’re seeing a lot in the crypto space,” said Stephanie Avakian, co-director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division, at a conference on Thursday. “We are very active, and I would just expect to see more and more.”

The SEC’s decision to aggressively police cryptocurrency offerings is particularly significant for the Ethereum community because many new cryptocurrency offerings are built on top of the Ethereum platform. People creating a new token on the Ethereum blockchain need to buy ether, the currency used to pay for Ethereum transactions. So if aggressive SEC enforcement ends the Initial Coin Offering (ICO) boom—which seems to be cooling anyway—it would remove a major factor that pushed ether’s value upward during 2017.

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Winklevoss twins propose self-regulatory body for cryptocurrency industry


Winklevoss twins propose self-regulatory body for cryptocurrency industry  MarketWatchWinklevoss Twins Have a Plan to Police Cryptocurrency Trading  BloombergFull coverage


The Massive OPM Hack Actually Hit 25 Million People

The Massive OPM Hack Actually Hit 25 Million People

It’s much worse than the government first announced.

The post The Massive OPM Hack Actually Hit 25 Million People appeared first on WIRED. hacked – Botnet malware discovered | PCWorld

Botnet malware discovered on server | PCWorld.

Thanks to a poor initial launch followed a few months later by the Heartbleed scare, has had its share of security problems. Now, we can add one more security snafu to the list. In early July, a hacker was able to infiltrate a server connected to, deposit malware on it, and remain undetected for about a month and a half.

The good news is no personal information was compromised and it appears the malware was never actually used, according to CNN. The compromised server was a test machine that site developers use to try out code before pushing it live on the servers hosting the actual site. The server did not contain any personally sensitive information such as names or Social Security numbers.

The problem was the test server was never supposed to be connected to the Internet and its security was not as robust as other servers on the network.

But’s inattentiveness was the anonymous hacker’s gain.

Searching government networks for vulnerable servers, the hacker was able to break-in because the server’s default password had not been changed, according to The Wall Street Journal. Even the U.S. government, it seems, can do with a refresher course every now and then on security .

From the sounds of it, this latest intrusion was little more than a close call. The malware itself was designed to add the test server to a botnet, which could then be used to attack other websites with distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDoS). Botnets are also routinely used to distribute spam email.

The hack on certainly could’ve been worse—if, for example, hackers were able to use the test server to get into other servers that did contain sensitive information.

Luckily that didn’t happen. What’s most concerning, however, is that it took site operators until August 25 to discover the intrusion. CNN reports that since the malware was not actually operational it was more difficult to discover. Nevertheless, clearly needs to audit its systems to make sure something like this doesn’t happen again, especially with the next open enrollment period slated to begin in a few months time on November 15. hacked