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Category: PCs

Windows 10 launches this summer in 190 countries

Microsoft’s leaner, meaner, latest iteration of Windows is coming in just a few months. Launching in 170 countries in 111 languages. Don’t forget: Windows 10 is a free upgrade if you’re already using Windows 7 or 8. Hiding in its imposing shadow, and launching at the same time, the company will release special free version of its OS for Internet of Things devices, which Microsoft’s Terry Myerson reckons could well find its way into ATMs and ultrasound machines.

via Windows 10 launches this summer in 190 countries.

The Alienware Area 51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC

The Alienware Area-51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC

Take a look inside the world’s most outrageous and overpowered retail PC

This article is to be read to the tune of a heavy metal soundtrack. Because the Alienware Area-51 is heavy, metal, and just as outrageous as Iron Maiden at its finest.

Announced at the end of last summer, the Area-51 was an immediate sensation thanks to its unconventional, otherworldly shape. Hexagons and sharp lines are an established trope in gaming PCs these days, but nobody had thought to make the entire chassis into a hexagon. None of the major manufacturers, anyway. And that’s what really excites me about this big and bold Alienware rig: it’s a huge company acting like a scrappy startup and experimenting with a whole new layout and construction.

FORGET THE SQUARE BOX, TRY THE HEXAGONAL ONE INSTEAD

The first noticeable thing about the Area-51 when it’s seen in person is that it’s surprisingly large. This is not an effort to minimize your PC’s footprint or visibility (like the Falcon Northwest Tiki). With LED lighting embedded into each side and around the front frame of the case, The Area-51 is designed to attract attention. The second thing you’ll notice, should you ever attempt to lift it, is that it weighs about as much as a small person. Alienware isn’t taking any chances with its choice of materials, and the company even claims that in spite of its massive weight, each corner of the Area-51 has been tested to withstand up to five times the weight of the entire system.

Read more:  The Alienware Area-51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC | The Verge.

Email Spoofing: Explained (and How to Protect Yourself)

Jason P. Stadtlander Headshot, Huffington Post

Recently a co-worker asked me “Why do people even bother to spoof my email address?”

First, for those of you joining me that have no idea what the term spoofing means – let us examine that.

Spoofing is defined as:

/spo͞of/
verb
1. imitate (something) while exaggerating its characteristic features for comic effect.
2. hoax or trick (someone).

Origin: late 19th century English comedian Arthur Roberts.

In the context of computers, to spoof one’s email address means that the sender is acting as if the email is coming from someone it is not.

How someone (or something) sends an email made to look like it comes from somewhere or somewhere it does not, is a little more technical to explain. So, if you don’t like tech talk, then skip to the next section “Why is my email address being spoofed?”

How are they spoofing me?

Spoofing email addresses is rather easy. All a person needs to spoof an email address is an SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) server (a server that can send email) and the appropriate email software. Most website hosting services will even provide an SMTP server in their hosting package. It is also possible to send email from your own computer if you load an SMTP server on it, however most ISPs will block port 25 (which is required to send out email).

Many of the available free SMTP servers will allow you to show a different “from” address than the actual registered domain that the email is transmitting from. However, to the recipient of said message, they will see that it actually came from the address you specified.

Now, there are special checks in place (and more being put into place) to prevent exactly this problem. One is called SPF or “Sender Policy Framework” which was developed by Meng Weng Wong in 2003. Basically, each time an email is sent, the receiving server compares the IP of the origin with the IP listed in the SPF record with the appropriate domain.

EXAMPLE 1: So, for example, let’s say someone tried to spoof Bill Gates (billgates@microsoft.com):
They would send an email on his behalf > the recipient server would then talk back to microsoft.com and say “Hey, I have an email that is coming from 123.123.123.123 stating that it was sent from billgates@microsoft.com.” > microsoft.com would then tell the recipient server, “No, sorry, it should be coming from 111.111.111.111.” and the message would never get delivered.

Why is my email address being spoofed?

Two basic reasons people (and machines) spoof:

1. Malicious: To cause useless internet traffic – ultimately hoping to bog down servers or bring them to a halt.

2. Because you were unlucky enough to have clicked the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Continue reading Email Spoofing: Explained on Huffington Post The Blog

Email Spoofing: Explained (and How to Protect Yourself) | Jason P. Stadtlander