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Bill Nye provides insight on science slang

Sporting a purple paisley bowtie, “Science Guy” Bill Nye breaks down the meaning of some science slang like “arsole,” “hinny,” and “jedi.”

Nye’s new documentary film Bill Nye: Science Guy premieres Wednesday, April 18 on POV on PBS.


Raleigh cops are investigating crime by getting Google to reveal the identity of every mobile user within acres of the scene

Public records requests have revealed that on at least four occasions, the Raleigh-Durham police obtained warrants forcing Google to reveal the identities of every mobile user within acres of a crime scene, sweeping up the personal information of thousands of people in a quest to locate a single perp.


Big Telco hates “regulation,” but they love their billions in government handouts

When it comes to killing Net Neutrality, Big Telco’s major talking point is that “government regulation” has no place in telcoms; but the reality is that the nation’s telecommunications providers are the recipients of regulatory gifts that run to $5B/year, and are expected to do very little in return for this corporate welfare.


Map of the dark web

The so-called dark web is now so big that mapping efforts are afoot. It feels a bit like the web in the 1990s! The creators explain:

The Dark Web Map is a visualization of the structure of Tor’s onion services, a.k.a. hidden services, a.k.a. the dark web. The map consist of 6,608 dark web sites crawled during January 2018. Each site is represented in the map as a screenshot, and sites with structural similarity are connected with a line. Groups of sites that are all similar to each other are arranged into clusters. You can move around the map and zoom in to areas of interest.


How these Microsoft tools can elevate your earning potential

When a company is considering pushing forward with a significant initiative, like a rebrand or new product launch, they’re likely to consult insights from their business data first. That’s why companies need professionals skilled with today’s data analysis tools, like Microsoft Excel and Access. The Microsoft Data Analysis Bundle can help you get up to speed with these programs, and it’s on sale in the Boing Boing Store for $29.

This 4-course collection features more than 30 hours of training in Microsoft Power BI, Excel, VBA, and Access. First, you’ll learn about Microsoft Power BI, an intuitive tool handy for working with corporate information and extracting meaningful reports. From there, you’ll leverage Microsoft Excel, VBA (Visual Basic for Applications), and Access to automate and organize raw data.

The Microsoft Data Analysis Bundle is on sale for $29 in the Boing Boing Store.


Ransomware decryptor | Kaspersky Lab


Are you a ransomware victim? The National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) of the Netherlands’ police, the Netherlands’ National Prosecutors Office and Kaspersky Lab have been working together to fight the CoinVault ransomware campaign. During our joint investigation we have been able to obtain data that can help you to decrypt the files being held hostage on your PC. We provide both decryption keys and the decryption application. For more information please see this how-to. Please note that this is an ongoing investigation and new keys will be added in the future.


via Ransomware decryptor | Kaspersky Lab.

US outlines how it will cut 28 percent of greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 | The Verge

The United States began to outline today how it will achieve the goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent by the end of 2025. In a submission to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United States says that it will use executive actions, largely under the Clean Air Act, to cut carbon pollution from new and existing power plants, improve fuel economy standards, and limit methane emissions from landfills and the oil and gas sectors. The submission comes ahead of a UN climate conference in Paris meant to coordinate a global response to climate change and prevent the Earth from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius, a widely accepted target for limiting the effects of warming.


via US outlines how it will cut 28 percent of greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 | The Verge.

The Alienware Area 51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC

The Alienware Area-51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC

Take a look inside the world’s most outrageous and overpowered retail PC

This article is to be read to the tune of a heavy metal soundtrack. Because the Alienware Area-51 is heavy, metal, and just as outrageous as Iron Maiden at its finest.

Announced at the end of last summer, the Area-51 was an immediate sensation thanks to its unconventional, otherworldly shape. Hexagons and sharp lines are an established trope in gaming PCs these days, but nobody had thought to make the entire chassis into a hexagon. None of the major manufacturers, anyway. And that’s what really excites me about this big and bold Alienware rig: it’s a huge company acting like a scrappy startup and experimenting with a whole new layout and construction.


The first noticeable thing about the Area-51 when it’s seen in person is that it’s surprisingly large. This is not an effort to minimize your PC’s footprint or visibility (like the Falcon Northwest Tiki). With LED lighting embedded into each side and around the front frame of the case, The Area-51 is designed to attract attention. The second thing you’ll notice, should you ever attempt to lift it, is that it weighs about as much as a small person. Alienware isn’t taking any chances with its choice of materials, and the company even claims that in spite of its massive weight, each corner of the Area-51 has been tested to withstand up to five times the weight of the entire system.

Read more:  The Alienware Area-51 is a spaceship disguised as a gaming PC | The Verge.

Facebook Finally Lets Its Firehose Be Tapped For Marketing Insights Thanks To DataSift – Droolin’ Dog dot Net

Facebook Finally Lets Its Firehose Be Tapped For Marketing Insights Thanks To DataSift – Droolin’ Dog dot Net.

Microsoft releases 14 patches for Windows


Microsoft released patches for 14 vulnerabilities in its Windows operating system, Office and Internet Explorer software on Tuesday, including four it deemed critical, it’s highest severity rating.

All four of the critical bugs could allow attackers to remotely execute programs on a targeted system, something that in the past has allowed hackers to steal personal information such as passwords or take over machines for the purpose of sending spam.

The patches were released as part of the company’s monthly “patch Tuesdaysecurity update for its major software products. The company had originally planned to deliver 16 updates Tuesday, but two are marked as yet to appear. They include one that was expected to carry a critical rating.

At 14, the number of patches is a monthly record for 2013 and 2014.

They include a problem with Windows Object Linking and Embedding that could allow remote code execution if the user visits a website containing malicious code. If the user is logged in as the administrator, the attacker could gain the ability to install programs and change and delete data. A related patch for Internet Explorer fixes the vulnerability with malicious websites and 16 other problems with the software, said Microsoft.

A security update for the Microsoft Secure Channel software in Windows fixes a problem that leaves Windows Server vulnerable to attack from specially crafted packets. The fourth critical patch fixes a hole in Windows that allows attackers to invoke Microsoft XML Core Services from a malicious website and then remotely execute code on a target system.

A further seven patches are marked as important—the second highest rank.

One vulnerability in Microsoft Office allows for remote execution of code, four additional problems allow attackers to assign themselves higher privileges and two allow bypass of certain security features in Windows.

via Microsoft releases 14 patches for Windows security problems | PCWorld.

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