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Category: #AudioGear (Page 1 of 2)

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How to Manually Switch AirPods Between Mac, iPhone, and iPad

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If you love your AirPods or AirPods Pro, you might want to use them with all of your Apple devices. Here’s how you can manually switch your AirPods or AirPods Pro between Mac, iPhone, and iPad in just a couple of taps or clicks.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/679203/how-to-manually-switch-airpods-between-mac-iphone-and-ipad/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Khamosh Pathak

The iRig Pro Duo makes managing advanced audio workflows simple anywhere

Connecting audio interfaces to the various mobile and computing devices we use these days can be a confusing headache. The iRig Pro Duo, which IK Multimedia announced this year at CES and recently released, is a great way to simplify those connections while giving you all the flexibility you need to record high-quality audio anywhere, with any device.

The basics

The iRig Pro Duo is a new addition to IK’s lineup based on the original iRig Pro, which adds a second XLR input, as the name implies. It’s still quite small and portable, fitting roughly in your hand, with built-in power optionally supplied via two AA batteries, while you can also power it via USB connection, or with an optional dedicated plug-in power adapter accessory.

Compared to desktop devices like the Scarlett Focusrite 2i2 USB audio interface that’s a popular standard among home audio enthusiasts, the iRig Pro Duo is downright tiny. It’s still beefier than the iRig Pro, of course, but it’s a perfect addition to a mobile podcaster’s kit for ultimately portability while also maintaining all the features and capabilities you need.

The iRig Pro Duo also includes balanced L/R 1/4″ output, built-in 48v phantom power for passive Macs, a 3.5mm stereo jack for direct monitoring, 2x MIDI inputs and dedicated gain control with simple LED indicators for 48V power status and to indicate audio input peaking.

Design

Beveled edges and a slightly rounded rectangular box design might not win the iRig Pro Duo any accolades from the haute design community, but it’s a very practical form factor for this type of device. Inputs go in one side, and output comes out the other. IK Multimedia employs a unique connector for its output cables, but provides every one you could need in the box for connecting to Mac, iOS, Windows and Android devices.



The whole thing is wrapped in a matte, slightly rubberized outside surface that feels grippy and durable, while also looking good in an understated way that suits its purpose as a facilitation device. The knobs are large and easy to turn with fine-grained control, and there are pads on the underside of the Duo to help it stick a bit better to a surface like a table or countertop.

The lighting system is pretty effective when it comes to a shorthand for what’s on and working with your system, but this is one area where it might be nice to have a more comprehensive on-device audio levels display, for instance. Still, it does the job, and since you’ll likely be working with some kind of digital audio workflow software whenever you’re using it that will have a much more detailed visualizer, it’s not really that much of an issue.

Bottom line

As mentioned, iRig Pro Duo works with virtually all platforms out of the box, and has physical connector cables to ensure it can connect to just about every one as well. IK Multimedia also supplies free DAW software and effects, for all platforms – though you do have to make a choice about which one you’re most interested in since it’s limited to one piece of software per customer.

If you’re looking for a simple, painless and versatile way to either set up a way to lay down some music, or to record a solo or interview podcast, this is an option that ticks essentially all the boxes you could come up with.

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Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/06/29/the-irig-pro-duo-makes-managing-advanced-audio-workflows-simple-and-anywhere/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Darrell Etherington

Smart Speakers vs. Bluetooth Speakers: What’s the Difference and Which Should You Buy?

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There’s only so much you can learn from a name. Bluetooth speakers and smart speakers may look similar, but they’re significantly different from one another in terms of portability, convenience, and function. But what are the differences between Bluetooth speakers and smart speakers, and which should you buy?

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/45166/smart-speakers-vs-bluetooth-speakers-whats-the-difference-and-which-should-you-buy/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Heinzman

Now any Windows 10 user can grab Razer’s THX spatial audio app

d5b3e360-afe1-11ea-bf97-d4e880e45e97Razer certainly knows the power of the THX brand. In 2017, the Razer Blade Pro was the first laptop to sport THX’s mobile certification, which guaranteed a high level of display and audio quality. Later, the two companies worked together on a spatial…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/razer-thx-spatial-audio-app-windows-10-150000557.html
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The Sennheiser Flex 5000 Beats Bluetooth for TV Audio on Headphones

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Lots of TV sets still don’t have Bluetooth or other capabilities to use wired or wireless headphones. The Sennheiser Flex 5000 lets you use your wired headphones to listen to your favorite TV shows as loud as you want, without having to run wires all over the place.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/43681/the-sennheiser-flex-5000-wirelessly-transmits-audio-to-your-wired-headphones/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Ted Needleman

Skullcandy and Tile Team Up to Make True Wireless Earbuds You Won’t Lose

A woman wearing the Skullcandy Indy FuelSkullcandy

One of the biggest arguments I hear against true wireless earbuds is that users are afraid they’ll lose them. It’s a valid point—they’re tiny objects, after all. But Skullcandy wants to negate that fear with its newest earbuds because they feature built-in Tile trackers. How cool is that?

The lineup consists of four new sets of earbuds ranging from $60 to $100, but all of them come with Tile out of the box. When I first heard the news, I assumed (please don’t assume) that tracking would be built into the case, but I’m happy to report that isn’t the case—each bud has its own tracking chip. That’s smart.

You’ll pair the buds up with the Tile app (iOS/Android), and that’s all there is to it (all the buds also work with the Skullcandy app for iOS and Android). if you misplace a bud, just fire the Tile app up and search for it. It’ll make a noise so you can easily find it. It’s worth noting that this also works when the buds are in the case, so you should be able to find them in nearly any situation (unless you lose the case while wearing the buds, I guess).

There are four styles of earbuds, each a little different from the others. Here’s the skinny:

Push Ultra ($99.99)

Skullcandy Push Ultra in Energized YellowSkullcandy

  • Workout-style buds with moldable earhooks
  • 6 hour play time/34 hours from the case; rapid charge
  • IP67 sweat- and water-proof
  • Ambidextrous design with full physical controls on both buds
  • Wireless charging case
  • Available in Energized Yellow and Black; Bleached Blue coming Spring 2021

Indy Fuel ($99.99)

Skullcandy Indy Fuel in BlackSkullcandy

  • Stick-style buds with ear wings
  • 6 hour play time/24 hours from the case; rapid charge
  • IP55 sweat-, water-, and dust-resistance
  • Ambidextrous design with touch controls on each bud
  • Either bud can be used solo
  • Wireless charging case
  • Available in Black

Indy Evo ($79.99)

Skullcandy Indy Evo in Pure MintSkullcandy

  • Stick-style buds with ear wings
  • 6 hour play time/24 hours from the case; rapid charge
  • IP55 sweat-, water-, and dust-resistance
  • Ambidextrous design with touch controls on each bud
  • Either bud can be used solo
  • Available in Pure Mint, Black, and Chill Grey

Sesh Evo ($59.99)

Skullcandy Sesh Evo in Bleached BlueSkullcandy

  • Small form factor
  • 6 hour play time/18 hours from the case; rapid charge
  • IP55 sweat-, water-, and dust-resistance
  • Ambidextrous design with touch controls on each bud
  • Either bud can be used solo
  • Available in Black, Pure Mint, and Bleached Blue

Most of these are available to order today, save for the Bleached Blue models where applicable—those seem to be delayed across the board.

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/43594/skullcandy-and-tile-team-up-to-make-true-wireless-earbuds-you-wont-lose/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Cameron Summerson

Spotify drops the 10,000-song cap on libraries

01c049f0-9f5f-11ea-affb-705dd19d9697At long last, Spotify is dropping the 10,000-song limit on My Library, so you’ll be able to save as many tracks and albums as you like for easier access to them. You won’t need to remove any tunes to make space for new ones anymore.It’s a welcome qua…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/spotify-library-song-limit-151237444.html
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How to Check AirPods Battery on iPhone, Apple Watch, and Mac

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It’s easy to leave your AirPods in your ears for hours. Want to check your earbuds’ battery percentage before you hear the AirPods-almost-out-of-juice chime? Here’s how to check your AirPods’ battery on iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Mac.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/671421/how-to-check-airpods-battery-on-iphone-apple-watch-and-mac/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Khamosh Pathak

How to Fix Bad Stereo with Audacity

bad-stereo-audacity-feature-image.jpeg Do you have a video with sound running through only one of your speakers? You can use Audacity to fix these bad stereo issues within a matter of minutes, making your audio more professional and consistent. Although we’re assuming you have a video with unbalanced sound, this tutorial is equally applicable to standalone audio. The most likely scenario is a video with sound that needs fixing. But if you just have standalone audio, skip the next section. If you’re here because of noisy audio, see our guide on noise removal using Audacity. If you do have a… Read more13553342.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/fix-bad-stereo-with-audacity/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: John Knight

Razer’s First Try at a Set of “Lifestyle” Headphones Is Pretty Sharp

Razer Opus headphones side viewCameron Summerson

The Opus is Razer’s first foray into “lifestyle” headphones. With a surprisingly understated design, these are made to wear anywhere and anytime. They have ANC, are THX-certified, and cost $199. Overall, they’re solid—but if sound quality is your primary concern with headphones, they may leave you wanting.

To look at the Razer Opus is to know exactly where the inspiration for them came from They have a similar aesthetic to the Sony WH-1000MX3 everyone loves—the ANC and power buttons are even in the same place. They also come with a very similar case and fold up in a very similar manner to fit in said case.

Of course, there are plenty of differences between the two. But it’s hard to look at both sets without at least making some comparisons.

Speaking of button placement, here’s the rundown. The left cup is where the power and ANC buttons are, along with the 3.5mm jack (for wired play) and the USB-C charging port. The right cup houses the volume +/- buttons, with a play/pause button snuggled in between them. You can also use this to switch tracks: a double-click moves forward one track; a triple-click goes back.

Sony WH-1000mxRazer Opus

Left: Sony WH-1000MX3; Right: Razer Opus

My biggest annoyance here is with the volume buttons—the button towards the front lowers the volume, the one to the back raises it. That feels backward to my dumb brain, and I get it wrong every time. The headphones also feature autopause when you take them off.

Once on my skull, the Opus are impressively comfortable. The ear cups are around-the-ear, so they don’t smush the top of my ear into the side of my head. They’re also comfortable with glasses on, which I appreciate because I have to wear those stupid things when I’m working so I can, you know, read. The band and cups are both made of a “plush leatherette foam” according to Razer. I agree—it’s plush as hell and equally as leatherette. They’re comfy.

The earpads on the Razer OpusCameron Summerson

And then there’s the sound quality. It’s been a while since I’ve used the Sony WH-whatever, but can remember the big, bold, full sound quality they produced. Well, the Opus doesn’t have that. They sound good, but I wouldn’t call them great—especially not with ANC turned off. There’s a noticeable change in sound quality when you toggle ANC, and it’s honestly sort of jarring. To the point that, if I didn’t know better, I would think I was using a totally different set of headphones.

With ANC off, there’s a spike in the midrange and a drop in the low end, making these sound “rounder” than I’d like. Toggle the ANC on and the low end jumps dramatically, almost to the point where they sound muffled. What’s interesting is that this is a temporary spike—it seems to level out after about 10-15 seconds, but still retains a much more defined low end than with ANC off. This peak and valley transition is a subtle change, but it’s something I definitely noticed every time I enabled ANC. So, to be clear, I think they sound much better with ANC on.

Speaking of, the ANC on these headphones is very good. It’s easily on par with or better than everything else I’ve tried in this price range (or even higher). It does a great job of blocking out a wide range of frequencies. No complaints there. Razer says you can get 25 hours of battery life from the Opus with ANC active, which falls in line with my tests. I imagine disabling ANC would bump this to the 30-35 hour figure, though your mileage will vary depending on volume level and the like.

The Razer Opus appThe settings menu in the Opus app

There’s also a dedicated Opus app that allows you to toggle the EQ with a series of presets:

  • THX: This is the preset designed specifically by THX for the most accurate and balanced overall soundstage.
  • Amplified: This offers a bump in the lower midrange, which I personally hate. But if you like low mids, then you’ll like this setting.
  • Vocal: Bumps the 350 Hz and 3k Hz ranges to amplify the human voice.
  • Enhanced Bass: This bumps the 100 Hz and 300 Hz ranges quite a bit, as well as the 10k Hz range just a bit. This amplifies the low end while also balancing the treble a bit. To my ears it just sounds more muffled.
  • Enhanced Clarity: A massive bump to the 1k, 3k, and 10k Hz ranges, with a drop in the 100 Hz range. Basically, more treble, less bass.

The biggest downside is that there isn’t an option to manually set the EQ. Hopefully this is something Razer can build into the app in the future, because I’d love to be able to drop the 1k range just a little bit. Overall I feel like these are too heavy on the midrange across all settings, so I’d like the option to cut some of that out.

The Razer Opus folded and lying flatCameron Summerson

All in all, the Opus is an interesting product from Razer, as they lack any of the branding that you’d normally find on a Razer device—there isn’t a triple snake logo in sight. I like the understated look, and while the sound quality isn’t great, it’s still quite good. If Razer tweaks the apps to allow user EQ settings, that would help.

The $199 price tag is nice, as it undercuts the $349 MSRP of the Sony WH-1000MX3 by a good margin. That said, you can often catch the Sonys for $275 on sale (we’ve seen them as low as $230). If sound quality is your primary concern, then it may be worth waiting until you can grab the Sonys for the lowest price. But if you’re in a hurry, the Opus are far from a bad choice—and if Razer makes the EQ tweakable in the app, they’ll be even better.

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/42523/razer-opus-headphones-review-good-not-great/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Cameron Summerson

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