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Category: #CivilRights

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Corporate America Is Building Its Own Surveillance State. Will the FTC Stop It?

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Americans are used to hearing about what a great country they live in—how lucky they are to have been born in, or to have immigrated to, the United States. “American exceptionalism”—a phrase, funnily enough, coined by Joseph Stalin—is an idea that, on the whole, is still embedded in the country’s collective identity.…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/corporate-america-is-building-its-own-surveillance-stat-1847389626
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dell Cameron

New York requires $15 broadband for poor people, promptly gets sued by ISPs

A pen and book resting atop a paper copy of a lawsuit.

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | eccolo74)

Internet service providers today sued New York to block a state law that requires ISPs to sell $15-per-month broadband plans to low-income households.

The lawsuit was filed by lobby groups including USTelecom and CTIA–The Wireless Association, both of which count Verizon and AT&T among their members. Lobby groups for many other ISPs also joined the lawsuit, with plaintiffs including NTCA–The Rural Broadband Association, the Satellite Broadcasting & Communications Association, and the New York State Telecommunications Association. The biggest cable lobby group, NCTA, did not join the lawsuit, but a cable lobby group representing small providers—America’s Communications Association—is one of the plaintiffs suing New York.

New York enacted its cheap-broadband law two weeks ago and called it a “first-in-the-nation requirement for affordable Internet for qualifying low-income families.”

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Source: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/04/isps-sue-new-york-to-block-law-requiring-15-broadband-for-poor-people/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Jon Brodkin

Signal’s response to FBI’s grand jury subpoena for user data is basically “You get nothing. You lose. Good day, sir”

Signal, the popular messaging service with end-to-end encryption, stores precious little user data — “Unix timestamps for when each account was created and the date that each account last connected to the Signal service.”

So when the FBI subpoenaed Signal to turn over “a wide variety of information… including the addresses of the users, their correspondence, and the name associated with each account,” Signal enlisted the aid of the ACLU, which replied to the FBI with a polite version of the Willy Winka “you get nothing” meme. — Read the rest

Source: https://boingboing.net/2021/04/29/signals-response-to-fbis-grand-jury-subpoena-for-user-data-you-get-nothing-you-lose-good-day-sir.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=signals-response-to-fbis-grand-jury-subpoena-for-user-data-you-get-nothing-you-lose-good-day-sir
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Mark Frauenfelder

Why the Internet Should Be a Public Utility

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The internet is here, it’s just not evenly distributed. While some people have access to high-speed fiber-optic cable running to their house or phones ready to connect to 5G, there are also swaths of broadband deserts where people can’t access internet at reliable speeds.

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/why-the-internet-should-be-a-public-utility-1845509479
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Brian Kahn and Alex Cranz

NJ Supreme Court rules you don’t have a constitutional right not to unlock your phone

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Even though the United States Constitution gives citizens the right not to incriminate themselves, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that police can force you to unlock your iPhone.

From Ars Technica:

On Monday, the New Jersey Supreme Court rejected that Fifth Amendment claim. The Fifth Amendment only protects defendants against self-incriminating testimony, not the production of incriminating documents. While “testimony” usually refers to speech, that’s not always the case. Sometimes, a defendant can reveal information by his or her actions. For example, if the government doesn’t already know who owns a phone, then forcing a defendant to unlock it amounts to forced testimony that the defendant is the owner.

Source: https://boingboing.net/2020/08/11/nj-supreme-court-rules-you-don.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Mark Frauenfelder