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Category: #Cybersecurity (Page 1 of 2)

How to Set Up a Firewall in Linux

disable-enable-manage-ubuntu-firewall-fe To keep your computer safe, it is advisable to set up a firewall to prevent others from accessing your computer and protect you from network attacks. However, if you are a new Linux user, you might not know how to configure the firewall in your system. You’ll learn here how to set up a firewall in Linux and how to easily add rules to allow access for other devices in your local network or specific ports. UFW = Uncomplicated Firewall We’ll use UFW to manage your Linux firewall since it is easy to use and comes installed by… Read more13556740.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/how-to-set-up-firewall-linux/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

Senate passes FISA renewal bill, sends it back to the House

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The Senate approved legislation Thursday to renew a handful of key domestic surveillance powers, but only after civil libertarians attached language that the Justice Department warns would “unacceptably degrade” national security.

Now the bill goes back to the House for possibly more tinkering, leaving a cloud over its chances for swift final approval.

The USA Freedom Reauthorization Act of 2020 passed the Senate by an 80-16 vote more than two months after the House approved it by a wide, bipartisan margin. But Thursday’s vote came a day after Senate privacy hawks successfully amended the bill to expand legal protections for certain groups of individuals targeted by federal surveillance — a change that DOJ labeled unacceptable.

“We appreciate the Senate’s reauthorization of three expired national security authorities,” department national security spokesman Marc Raimondi said in a statement. But he said the amended bill “would unacceptably degrade our ability to conduct surveillance of terrorists, spies and other national security threats.”

President Donald Trump, who has accused a government “deep state” of misusing its spying powers, also has not indicated whether he would sign the bill.

The vote occurred mere hours after the announcement that Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), who in March argued passionately against letting the authorities lapse, will temporarily step down as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee amid a probe into his stock trades.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi didn’t say during her weekly news conference Thursday when the chamber would take up the amended measure.

A Democratic leadership aide told POLITICO that it won’t be considered on Friday when the House convenes to vote on the latest Covid-19 relief package. The aide said the leadership was “assessing next steps.”

The FISA renewal bill includes new privacy protections that Attorney General William Barr had helped negotiate and would impose new requirements on the FISA court system. Those were inspired in part by Trump’s allegations that the Obama administration improperly used the spying tools to wiretap his former campaign adviser Carter Page during the initial probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The bill would also permanently end an already deactivated NSA program that had allowed the agency to obtain, with judicial approval, Americans’ phone records in terrorism probes.

Thursday’s successful passage came months after the House voted to reauthorize the authorities with modest changes. The Senate, however, couldn’t reach an agreement for quick passage of the House bill in March amid objections from the chamber’s privacy advocates. The chamber eventually adopted a 77-day extension as a short-term solution, but the House never took it up.

The intelligence tools the authorities enabled have remained offline ever since.

The measure now kicks back to the House, where progressives and libertarians could use the Senate’s changes as leverage to reopen debate on the legislation and try to amend it even further. That’s especially a possibility for those GOP members who have demanded that the chamber reopen for business as usual despite the pandemic.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), who along with Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) secured the amendment expanding legal protections, called the legislation a “good bill.”

“We got some good reforms here. They are consistent with many of the aims that House members who negotiated the last House bill had in mind,” Lee told POLITICO before the final vote. He had previously lobbied Trump to veto the measure if it reached his desk unaltered.

“I’m certainly not going to tell them what to do with it,” Lee added, though he suggested he might support something similar to a proposed amendment from Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.) that would have protected Americans’ internet browsing and search histories from federal surveillance. It came up just one vote shy of the 60-vote threshold.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) said the Leahy-Lee amendment “took us a step closer to properly protecting Americans’ civil liberties, and it’s clear we need to go farther.” She had successfully scuttled the House’s first surveillance package in February just hours before the House Judiciary Committee was due to mark it up.

On Thursday, she specifically cited the Wyden-Daines amendment, saying that “it’s now the House’s responsibility to curb this violation of Americans’ rights. I know it’s still within our grasp as lawmakers to push for the significant privacy reforms we need.”

Other House members also seem itching for a fresh surveillance fight.

“Although I am pleased that the Lee-Leahy Amendment passed, I oppose the bill without further amendment. If permitted by House rules, I will offer amendments,” Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) said in a statement to POLITICO. He and Lofgren co-sponsored an alternative renewal bill to the one the House passed.

Source: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/05/14/senate-passes-fisa-renewal-259064
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Martin Matishak

How to Unlock Android Phone’s Safe Folder

Featured-Unlock-Android-Phone-Safe-Folde Do you have any favorite pictures or files on a phone you don’t want others to view? On certain Android handsets, there is a built-in safe feature that allows you to encrypt and hide these private files using a pattern or PIN. Retrieving these files can sometimes be tricky, as the exact location of the safe is hidden from view in specific phones. By mistake, you may find yourself locked out of your own personal data. If you’re wondering how to recover your files from such an inaccessible Android safe folder, follow the methods below to unlock your Android safe folder…. Read more13532762.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/unlock-android-phones-safe-folder/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sayak Boral

What Is a Man-in-the-Middle Attack?

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A man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack occurs when someone sits between two computers (such as a laptop and remote server) and intercepts traffic. This person can eavesdrop on, or even intercept, communications between the two machines and steal information.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/668989/what-is-a-man-in-the-middle-attack/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Matthew Hughes

Instagram adds new anti-bullying features, including tag controls, comment management tools

As part of its anti-bullying efforts, Instagram today announced a series of new features aimed at helping users better manage negative comments as well as highlight positive ones. It’s also adding new controls to manage who can tag or mention you on Instagram, which can be another source of online bullying.

The first of the new features for managing negative comments is specifically aimed at those who own or help run Instagram accounts with a large following. Being able to manage a surge of negative comments on these accounts can be difficult — especially in the case of a post that’s gone viral or a coordinated attack from online trolls or bots.

Instagram has been testing a new feature that allows account holders to delete comments in bulk and restrict multiple accounts that post negative comments. This could effectively silence those who regularly stalk high-profile accounts with the main goal of leaving negative or trolling remarks. The company says the early feedback from its tests has been encouraging, so it’s opening up the feature to Instagram users on mobile.

On iOS, you can tap on a comment, then the dotted icon in the top-right corner where you’ll choose “Manage Comments.” This will allow you to choose up to 25 comments to delete at once. If you tap “More Options,” you’ll also find a feature that lets you block or restrict commenters’ accounts in bulk. On Android, you’ll instead press and hold on comment, then tap the dotted icon, and select Block or Restrict.

Another new feature, Pinned Comments, will soon launch as a test.

The idea here is to give Instagram users a way to amplify positive comments. This can help set the tone for the community and encourage more positive interactions, as a result. When the feature goes live, users will be able to select and pin a number of comments to the top of their comments thread, where they’re more easily seen.

While these features will put account owners in better control over their community, they may also have the effect of silencing valid criticism or any comments the poster simply doesn’t like. Twitter, by comparison, offers a way for users to hide replies they don’t like — but it doesn’t remove them from its platform. Instead, the replies are hidden behind an extra click, keeping them visible to anyone who knows where to look.

Instagram is also now rolling out a set of expanded controls that allow you to choose who’s allowed to mention or tag you in comments, captions, or Stories. You’ll be able to select from “Everyone,” “Only People You Follow” or “No One,” for both tags and mentions. In addition, you’ll be able to toggle on or off an option that gives you the ability to manually approve tags.

The launch of the trio of new features comes alongside Facebook’s fifth edition of its Community Standards Enforcement Report, which details how well the company has been able to enforce its policies across its suite of apps.

For the first time, the report shared enforcement data for bullying on Instagram, noting that it took action on 1.5 million pieces of content in both Q4 2019 and Q1 2020.

The company also made improvements to its text and image matching technology to find more suicide and self-injury content on Instagram, it said. As a result, it increased the action on this content by 40% and increased its proactive detection rate by more than 12 points since its last report. The technology used to finding and removing child nudity and sexual exploitative content was improved across both Facebook and Instagram, as well.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/12/instagram-adds-new-anti-bullying-features-including-tag-controls-comment-management-tools/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sarah Perez

How to Set File Permissions on Mac

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Like all major operating systems, macOS allows you to restrict access to files using a complex set of file permissions. You can set these yourself using the Finder app, or by using the chmod command in your Mac’s terminal. Here’s how.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/669095/how-to-set-file-permissions-on-mac/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Ben Stockton

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