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Category: #GigEconomy

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Attempting to reform gig work via co-ops

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Ride-hailing service The Drivers Cooperative recently debuted in New York City, claiming that its lack of VC funding would result in better driver pay and lower passenger costs.

Why it matters: TDC’s approach is a direct rebuke to the venture capital-fueled gig economy model.


Details: The organization is incorporated as a “worker cooperative corporation” and currently lets every signed-up driver enroll as a member of the co-op, which means receiving one share in the company and one shareholder vote.

  • The co-op takes a 15% cut of rides (compared to Uber and Lyft’s roughly 20%) to fund its operations, and any leftovers at the end of the year will go back to drivers via profit-sharing.
  • The company says its drivers currently make on average about 30% more than they would driving for Uber or Lyft, and that riders pay slightly less.

The big picture: A number of companies have tried (and often failed) to reform the model popularized by Uber and Lyft, including:

  • Juno: The NYC-born startup promised it would give drivers equity in its company. It eventually sold to U.K.-based Gett and backtracked on its equity promise because regulators wouldn’t allow it.
  • Austin’s indies: A crop of upstarts, including a nonprofit and a Facebook group matching drivers and riders, emerged in Austin a few years ago when Uber and Lyft ceased operating for a year.
  • Dumpling: The startup, which charges drivers a monthly fee for using its app instead of taking a cut from each transaction, recently expanded into ride-hailing after getting its start in grocery delivery. Unfortunately, it’s reportedly also run afoul of some workers with changes made to its apps.

Between the lines: “We’re actually selling things for the price that they cost,” says TDC co-founder Erik Forman, adding that Uber and Lyft’s lack of profits are a sign that their approach isn’t actually working.

  • The argument for the venture-backed model has been that it takes a lot of upfront capital to set up operations and grow very quickly to capture market share and compete with rivals.
  • That’s also meant price wars on all fronts — including price cuts for riders and earnings bumps for drivers — which has mostly been financed by venture capital for the first several years of a company’s life.
  • TDC has only raised about $300,000 via mostly debt and is preparing to raise just over $1 million.

And it’s not the only one to take this approach. Driver’s Seat, an app for drivers to collect and analyze data about their hours and earnings, is also set up as a cooperative. While free for drivers, it sells access to aggregate data and insights to municipalities.

  • Co-founder Hays Witt says the aim is to give drivers back some ownership and control over their work data.

Yes, but: It remains to be seen how a smaller, local upstart can fare in the face of multibillion-dollar public companies that are already household names.

  • While its brand can certainly appeal to many drivers’ and passengers’ sense of using a more “ethical” service, some will undoubtedly prefer convenience or sticking with the familiar.
  • And while Forman sees the technology as a commodity, companies like Uber and Lyft spend tremendous resources on developing, maintaining and fine-tuning their apps to keep drivers and riders happy.

The bottom line: Uber and Lyft proved there’s a market for smartphone-enabled urban transportation — but the quest to meet that demand via a radically different approach to business is ongoing.

Source: https://www.axios.com/reform-gig-work-co-ops-ride-hailing-uber-lyft-ee4848cf-d80c-4fa7-9297-10a19b23196d.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Kia Kokalitcheva

California ridesharing services must use zero-emissions vehicles starting in 2023

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has announced that in accordance with the implementation of SB 1014 of 2018, a regulation has been adopted that will require ridesharing companies to begin the electrification of their California fleets starting in 2023. CARB says the move is an another step towards meeting California’s 2030 climate goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/california-ridesharing-services-must-use-zero-emissions-vehicles-starting-in-2023-21673870/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Shane McGlaun

Uber teams with Walgreens to help riders get COVID-19 vaccine

Ride-sharing company Uber has teamed up with Walgreens to help customers get appointments for a COVID-19 vaccine at the same time they schedule a ride to the pharmacy. With this new feature, users can browse vaccination appointment time slots at Walgreens in the Uber app, claim the time they want, then continue on to book a ride for the appointment. … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/uber-teams-with-walgreens-to-help-riders-get-covid-19-vaccine-28670825/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Brittany A. Roston

How to Start a Concierge Business

Starting a concierge business is a great idea! People are busier than ever these days, and you can provide a much-needed service by helping them take care of things like errands and other tasks. Even better, you can run this business out of your home and you don’t need anyone other than yourself. You can always grow your team after you find your niche and become successful.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Business Organization

  1. Select which services you will offer. A personal concierge can offer a wide variety of services for their clients. Write down exactly what sort of concierge you want to be and what you will do. For example, maybe you are going to be a personal concierge that assists with errands and household tasks. You might include services like:[1]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    • Grocery shopping
    • Picking up/dropping off dry cleaning
    • Purchasing and sending gifts
    • Walking dogs
    • Caring for plants
  2. Focus on a niche where you can excel. You might start by offering a wide array of services and discover that you are better at some than others. You might also find that you really love doing some things and really dislike some others. It’s definitely okay to adjust your services as you grow your business. Find a niche where you can really do well and focus on expanding that area of your business.[2]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    • For example, maybe you discover that you’re getting a lot of great feedback about your gift buying services. Start developing that part of your business by adding more customizable options and doing more marketing in that area.
  3. Give your clients a high standard of service so they refer you to others. You want each client to feel like they are your most important. Try adding an extra touch, like leaving a personal note when you drop off their groceries or spending an extra few minutes playing with their dog. When your clients give you positive feedback, ask if they would mind leaving a positive review on social media or giving your name to a friend.[3]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • You can use these positive reviews in marketing and advertising your business.
  4. Get basic office equipment and reliable internet to run your business. Make sure that you have a cell phone that gets good reception so that your clients can easily reach you. You’ll also need a laptop with a stable internet connection so that you can work on your website and keep your accounts up to date. You don’t need much in the way of office furniture, especially if it’s just you starting your own business. If you have other employees, you might consider renting office space.[4]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 4 Version 2.jpg
    • You can print your promotional materials at a place like a FedEx or UPS store that offers professional printing so that you don’t have to invest in your own equipment.
  5. Expect to work non-traditional hours. A good concierge should be available when clients need them. That means that you shouldn’t plan to work a traditional 9-5 job. Depending on what types of services you offer, you might find yourself working early mornings, evenings, weekends, and even holidays.[5]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    • It’s also important to understand that most of your days will probably be different from each other. For example, you might have 7 clients on Mondays, but only 1 on Tuesdays. Use your downtime to work on things like billing and marketing.

[Edit]Finances and Insurance

  1. Draft a basic business plan to help define your business. You can develop a thorough plan at some point, but to get started, write a short plan that is about 10 pages. This will help you get a concrete idea of what your business will look like. You’ll be able to show it to others as you work to get the permits and insurance that you’ll need to get going. Make sure your business plan includes:[6]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 6 Version 2.jpg
    • Your business concept
    • Market analysis
    • Financial analysis
  2. Consult an expert about legal requirements for setting up a business. When you start a business, you need to determine if you should set it up as an LLC or an S corp. You also need to make sure that you get all of the local permits that are required. Sound confusing? It’s not just you that feels that way, so don’t worry. You’re not expected to know these things, so take a deep breath and ask someone who is an expert. Ask an attorney, your accountant, or tax preparer for advice.[7]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 7 Version 2.jpg
    • Share your business plan with them and ask them to help you navigate specific resources that you need for a concierge business. Your needs are probably different from someone opening up a cafe, for example.
    • Check city hall’s website for resources for starting a new business in your community. You’ll find lots of resources there, too.
    • Don’t shrug off getting permits. If you don’t have them, you could get in trouble for not properly setting up your business.
  3. Call your insurance agent to get coverage for your business. Even if you’re the only employee and you’re working from home, your personal insurance won’t cover your business. Call or email your insurance carrier and ask about business coverage. They might need to see your business plan, so be prepared to send them what you have. Ask them to walk you through different coverage options and the rates for each.[8]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 8 Version 2.jpg
    • Explain to the agent where your business will be located, how many employees will be working there, and answer any questions they have. This will help them understand your needs for your concierge business.
    • Get quotes from a couple of other agents. It never hurts to shop around a little for great rates. You can usually get a quick quote by visiting a website or making a phone call.
  4. Open business banking and credit accounts. Even though it might seem easier, don’t use your personal accounts to run your business. It will make things a lot easier at tax time and for general record-keeping if you keep things separate right from the start. Call or visit your bank and ask them to help you get set up with business accounts.[9]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    • For a business credit card, ask for one with a low APR and perks like cashback.
  5. Charge hourly rates for customers who use your services occasionally. As a concierge, you may have customers who contact you a few times a week or maybe a couple of times a year. For these types of clients, it’s probably a good idea to set up an hourly rate schedule. Determine your rates in advance and include them on your website. It’s okay to have different rates for different services. When your figure out your rates, take into account the difficulty of the task, whether you need transportation or equipment, and the going rate in your area.[10]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 10 Version 2.jpg
    • For example, you might charge $25 an hour for light housekeeping, but only $20 an hour for basic house sitting services that include bringing in mail and watering plants.
    • Typically, concierge services range from $25 per hour to $125 depending on the service and the market.
  6. Offer monthly rates for regular clients. You may attract clients that want to take advantage of many of your services on a regular basis. In this case, you will both probably find it easier if they pay a flat monthly fee rather than billing them by the hour. You can determine a maximum number of hours that you will work and make that part of the agreement. Make it clear on your website what a monthly rate includes.[11]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 11.jpg
    • For example, you could advertise a “Premium Package” that includes weekly errands, light housekeeping, and other tasks for $1500.
  7. Adjust your pricing as necessary. Once you’ve started taking clients you might realize that you have set your prices too low and you’re not making enough money. Or you might see the opposite and find out you’ve set prices too high and you’re having a hard time attracting clients. Don’t be afraid to adjust your prices as necessary. Starting a business is a learning curve.[12]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 12.jpg

[Edit]Marketing and Advertising

  1. Come up with a memorable name for your business. The name is going to be what people use to find your business, so try to come up with one that is catchy and descriptive. It should let people know what your business does and also be something that they will easily be able to recall.[13]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 13.jpg
    • Something like Paul’s Personal Concierge Service lets customers know that they will receive personal attention and the alliteration might help them remember it.
    • Run a quick Google search to make sure there is not already a business with the name you want to use.
  2. Build a basic website that is easy for customers to use. This might sound really tough, but don’t worry. There are lots of tools available to help you if you’ve never set up a website before. You can use an online platform like Weebly or Wix that will help you build a website for free.[14]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 14.jpg
    • You can also hire a professional to build and maintain your website for you if this is something you really don’t want to tackle.
  3. Use social media to attract customers. Social media is one of the best ways to advertise your new business because you can easily reach a wide audience and it’s free. Set up accounts for your business on popular sites like Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. Make sure to include important information like how to contact you and what services you provide in your bio.[15]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 15.jpg
    • Keep your posts professional and positive. Try an Instagram post that is a photo of a dog with the caption, “Does your best friend need some extra company while you work? Call Paul’s Personal Concierge Service! Available for pet care and all of your other personal assistant needs!”
  4. Ask everyone you know to spread the word about your new business. Word of mouth is another effective and free way to get new customers. Encourage family and friends to tell people about your new business. Let them know the important details, like the name, contact info, and services you provide.[16]
    Start a Concierge Business Step 16.jpg
    • Say something like, “Hey, it seems like the people you work with might be interested in a personal concierge. Would you mind hanging up one of my flyers in your break room?”

[Edit]Tips

  • Ask other small business owners in your area for tips about getting started.
  • Make sure you have reliable transportation for running errands.

[Edit]References

  1. https://theworkathomewife.com/how-to-start-a-personal-concierge-service-business/
  2. https://theconciergesociety.com/starting-a-personal-concierge-business-my-take-after-12-years-in-business/
  3. https://howtostartanllc.com/business-ideas/personal-concierge
  4. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930
  5. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930
  6. https://theworkathomewife.com/how-to-start-a-personal-concierge-service-business/
  7. https://theworkathomewife.com/how-to-start-a-personal-concierge-service-business/
  8. https://theconciergesociety.com/starting-a-personal-concierge-business-my-take-after-12-years-in-business/
  9. https://howtostartanllc.com/business-ideas/personal-concierge
  10. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930
  11. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930
  12. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930
  13. https://seniorservicebusiness.com/how-to-start-a-senior-concierge-business-in-10-easy-steps/
  14. https://howtostartanllc.com/business-ideas/personal-concierge
  15. https://howtostartanllc.com/business-ideas/personal-concierge
  16. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/37930

Source: https://www.wikihow.com/Start-a-Concierge-Business
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UK Supreme Court says Uber drivers are not independent contractors

UK Supreme Court says Uber drivers are not independent contractors

Enlarge (credit: Peter Summers/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom has ruled that Uber drivers are legally workers, not self-employed contractors as Uber has argued in courts around the world. The ruling means that drivers in Britain and Northern Ireland are eligible for additional benefits and protections, including a minimum wage.

Uber claims that it merely acts as a technology provider and broker between independent drivers and their customers—much as eBay facilitates sales between buyers and sellers. In Uber’s view, this means that it doesn’t owe its drivers benefits like unemployment insurance, doesn’t need to reimburse drivers for their costs, and isn’t bound by minimum wage and overtime rules. Uber emphasizes that its drivers are free to decide when, where, and how much they work.

But critics point out that Uber exerts a lot more control over its drivers—and over the driver-passenger relationship—than a conventional platform like eBay or Airbnb. Uber sets fares, collects payments from customers, deducts its own fee, and remits the remainder to the driver. It requires drivers to accept a large majority of the rides they are offered. It handles customer complaints and kicks drivers off the platform if their average rating falls too low.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Source: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/02/uk-supreme-court-says-uber-drivers-are-not-independent-contractors/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Timothy B. Lee

A Classic Tale of Two Prep School Friends Who Founded the Uber of Hangover IV Drips Then Somehow Started Covid-19 Testing for Cities

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Shortly before Thanksgiving, the Hoboken, New Jersey city council held an emergency meeting to vote on covid-19 testing contracts, the kind of event that was doubtlessly being replicated in Zoom conference rooms around the county. Hospitalizations in the state were the highest they’d been in six months. The local…

Read more…

Source: https://jezebel.com/a-classic-tale-of-two-prep-school-friends-who-founded-t-1846280271
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Molly Osberg on Jezebel, shared by Marina Galperina to Gizmodo

The gig economy, cannabis and car data are tech-election winners in 2020

Editor’s note: Get this free weekly recap of TechCrunch news that any startup can use by email every Saturday morning (7 a.m. PT). Subscribe here.

The US is settling in for some new form of national gridlock, but state and local propositions are busy defining how technology businesses will be allowed to work (legally) in the US. Policies on topics as broad as customer usage and employment or as narrow as a drug chemical got the vote across the country. The results provide a blueprint for what you might expect to see in many more places.

Perhaps the best example is Proposition 22 in California, where a majority of the voters approved of new rules that allow companies like Uber and Lyft to continue operating with drivers as independent contractors. A previous piece of state legislation and related lawsuit would have required the companies to classify many drivers as full-time employees. Here’s Megan Rose Dickey, on the impact of the result:

Throughout the case, Uber and Lyft have argued that reclassifying their drivers as employees would cause irreparable harm to the companies. In the ruling last month, the judge said neither company would suffer any “grave or irreparable harm by being prohibited from violating the law” and that their respective financial burdens “do not rise to the level of irreparable harm.”

But now that Prop 22 is projected to pass, this lawsuit has far less legal ground to stand on. It’s also worth noting that Uber has previously said it may pursue similar legislation in other states.

Naturally, the affected companies got a boost to their stock prices after the vote was called, and Uber is already working on taking the campaign global.

The US presidential election of 2020 has been the most technologically sophisticated ever, but I’m gonna skip because there are relatively few startup angles for us here. However, if you are trying to craft user policies about politics, consider this election-eve analysis from Taylor Hatmaker about how Facebook and Twitter have changed their approaches since 2016.

Other notable startup-y items from our election coverage:

Cannabis legalization measures set to pass in 5 states

Portland, Maine passes referendum banning facial surveillance

Massachusetts voters pass a right-to-repair measure, giving them unprecedented access to their car data

Calm’s hilarious CNN ad campaign sent the meditation app flying up App Store charts

YC-backed nonprofit VotingWorks wants to rebuild trust in election systems through open source

Something else happened in government this week that was not about the election — but may still be relevant to your startup. The SEC will now let companies raise up to $5 million per year in equity crowdfunding, up from a previous rule of $1.07 million. Lucas Matney has more for Extra Crunch.

The next billion-dollar e-commerce company will be a B2B marketplace

Business-to-business transactions are full of complexities beyond the consumer space, including four types of standard payment methods, sophisticated financing tools, bulk discounts, contractual pricing, delivery schedules, insurance and compliance. Merritt Hummer of Bain Capital Ventures breaks it down in a big guest post for Extra Crunch:

[I]t’s no wonder B2B e-commerce has been slower to digitize than B2C. From product discovery through the checkout process, a consumer buying a bag of licorice looks nothing like a retailer buying 100,000 bags of licorice from a distributor. The good news for B2B marketplace founders is that, based on the parameters above, there are many creative ways to extract value from transactions that go beyond the GMV take rate. Let’s explore some of the creative ways to monetize a B2B marketplace.

Instead of trying to take a cut of the gross merchandise value, like what Apple does with the App Store, successful startups have to be creative. These can include data monetization, embedded financial services, targeted advertising, private-label products, subscription fees and sampling fees. Here’s an excerpt from Hummer about that last one:

In most B2B verticals, individual transactions are so large that charging fees on a percentage basis means scaring potential customers away. In high-value markets with infrequent orders, charging a take rate on purchase orders will be perceived as unfair, especially when suppliers and buyers know each other already. But the fee-per-sample model is a unique wedge to aggregate suppliers and buyers, who often sample supplies before placing large orders.

One of our portfolio companies, Material Bank, has used this monetization strategy with success. Material Bank is a B2B marketplace for construction and interior design materials that warehouses samples (fabric swatches, paint chips, flooring materials, wall coverings, etc.) from hundreds of brands. Architects and interior designers can order free samples from Material Bank and receive them the next morning, and then ship samples back for free when they’re no longer needed. Material Bank charges the manufacturers a fee every time one of their samples is shipped out. Manufacturers receive new customer leads that require no effort to generate and are happy to outsource sample fulfillment, which was historically a cost center and not a core competency. Other B2B markets where sampling is well-established include chemicals, apparel and packaging materials.

How to start a VC fund without being rich already

Barriers to venture investing have been falling in recent years, as money has flowed into the asset class and as the opportunities for tech continue to grow. It is actually quite possible to raise your own fund if you don’t have much wealth to leverage — you’ll still have many things to figure out, though. Connie Loizos talks to limited partners and VCs who have been taking creative approaches for TechCrunch this week:

First, find investors, i.e. limited partners, who are willing to take less than 2% or 3% and maybe even less than 1% of the overall fund size being targeted. You’ll likely find fewer investors as that “commit” shrinks. But for example Joanna Rupp,  who runs the $1.1 billion private equity portfolio for the University of Chicago’s endowment, suggests that both she and other managers she knows are willing to be flexible based on the “specific situation of the GP.”

Says Rupp, “I think there are industry ‘norms,’ but we haven’t required a [general partner] commitment from younger GPs when we have felt that they don’t have the financial means.”

Bob Raynard, founder of the fund administration firm Standish Management, echoes the sentiment, saying that a smaller general partner commitment in exchange for special investor economics is also fairly common. “You might see a reduced management fee for the LP for helping them or reduced carry or both, and that has been done for years.”

Explore management fee offsets. Use your existing portfolio companies as collateral. Make a deal with wealthier friends if you can. Get a bank loan. Consider the merits of so-called front loading.

She goes on to explain a number of tips including:

  • Explore management fee offsets.

  • Use your existing portfolio companies as collateral.

  • Make a deal with wealthier friends if you can.

  • Get a bank loan.

  • Consider the merits of so-called front loading.

Yegor Aleyev/TASS (Photo by Yegor AleyevTASS via Getty Images)

Edtech startup M&A grows with the pandemic boom

Natasha Mascarenhas takes a look at the motivations behind recent acquisitions in the space for Extra Crunch this week, as edtech has gone from supplemental to vital during the pandemic. Here’s more detail about the Course Hero acquisition of Symbolab from the other week.

Symbolab is a math calculator that is set to answer over 1 billion questions this year. With each answer, Symbolab adds information to its algorithm regarding students’ most common pain points and confusion. Course Hero, in contrast, is a broader service that focuses on Q&A from a variety of subjects. CEO Andrew Grauer says Symbolab’s algorithm isn’t something that Course Hero, which has been operating since 2006, can drum up overnight. That’s precisely why he “decided to buy, instead of build… It made a lot of sense to move fast enough so it wouldn’t take up multiple years to get this technology.”

Around TechCrunch

Learn how to score your first check with TMV’s Soraya Darabi on November 10

Just one week left for early-bird passes to TC Sessions: Space 2020

Relativity Space’s Tim Ellis is coming to TC Sessions: Space 2020

Across the week

TechCrunch:

China postpones Ant’s colossal IPO after closed-door talk with Jack Ma

Study shows cities with ride-hailing services report lower rates of sexual assault

Mixtape podcast: Wellness in the time of the struggle

Why Florida residents may soon be seeing jet-powered ‘flying taxis’

UK report spotlights the huge investment gap facing diverse founders

Extra Crunch:

3 tips for SaaS founders hoping to join the $1 million ARR club

Inside fintech startup Upstart’s IPO filing

4 takeaways from fintech VC in Q3 2020

Is fintech’s Series A market hot, or just overhyped?

Implementing a data-driven approach to guarantee fair, equitable and transparent employee pay

#EquityPod: Fortnite is actually a SaaS company

From Alex Wilhelm:

Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast (now on Twitter!), where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

What a week from us here in the United States, where the election is still being tabulated and precisely zero people are stressed at all. But, no matter what, the wheels of Equity spin on, so Danny and Natasha and Alex and Chris got together once again to chat all things startups and venture capital:

  • Up top there was breaking news aplenty, including a suit from the U.S. government to try to block the huge Plaid-Visa deal. And, it was reported that Airbnb will drop its public S-1 filing early next week. That IPO is a go.
  • Next we turned to the gaming world, riffing off of this piece digging into the venture mechanics of making and selling video games. Our hosting crew had a few differences of opinion, but were able to agree that Doom 3 was a masterpiece before moving on.
  • Then it was time to talk Ant, and what the hell happened to its IPO. Luckily with Danny on deck we were in good hands. What a mess.
  • Prop 22 was passed, which effectively allows Uber, Instacart and Lyft to keep their gig workers labeled as independent contractors, instead of employees. As a result, Uber and Lyft stocks soared, while gig worker collectives said that the fight is still on.
  • Natasha scooped a series of Election Day filings from venture capital firms. In the mix: Precursor Ventures Fund IIIHustle Fund II and Insight Partner’s first Opportunity Fund.
  • And finally, despite Election Day turning into an entire week, the public markets are rallying. Will we see a boom of IPOs?
  • And, as a special treat, we didn’t even mention Maricopa County for the entire episode. Take care all!

Equity drops every Monday at 7:00 a.m. PDT and Thursday afternoon as fast as we can get it out, so subscribe to us on Apple PodcastsOvercastSpotify and all the casts.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/11/07/car-data-cannabis-and-the-gig-economy-are-tech-election-winners-in-2020/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Eric Eldon