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Category: #Linux (Page 1 of 12)

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Microsoft’s New Linux Distro Is a Warning Shot at Red Hat

A Linux Tux-like Logo with a Windows logo on his bellyhendrickn/Shutterstock / Microsoft

Ever so quietly, Microsoft dropped a new operating system out in the wild. No, not Windows 11. Microsoft created its own Linux Distribution. And while you might be tempted to crack jokes that Microsoft hates Linux, this is a big deal. Especially for anyone who relies on Red Hat or Suse.

Microsoft’s new Linux Distro, dubbed Common Base Linux (CBL)-Mariner, isn’t the type of distro you’d want to install directly on any old machine. It’s primarily meant for cloud infrastructure and edge products. Specifically Microsoft’s Cloud and Edge products.

But if you are curious, it’s possible to run. Juan Manuel Rey, a Microsoft Senior Program Manager for Azure VMware, recently published a guide to ISO CBL-Mariner image. With that, you can easily get it up and running. And you can build CBL-Mariner on an Ubuntu 18.04 desktop. So you can try it out, but that’s not the real purpose here.

It’s not a guarantee yet, but with CBL-Mariner, Microsoft could bring what it does best in Windows to Linux—Patch management and distribution. Windows updates might be a hated affair in the consumer world, but in the enterprise area, Microsoft wins points for predictability and reliability. You can carefully install updates, see what they do, roll them out to many machines at scale as you see fit. While Red Hat and Suse provide well-respected distros and some support, they don’t go anywhere near as far as Microsoft. And few other Linux companies (if any) can claim to support on the same massive scale as Microsoft.

It’s a compelling argument for anyone managing servers, especially lots of servers. The biggest reason to go with Windows server management tool is the superior server management processors, but Windows presents its own problems. Linux bypasses many of those issues but lacks the same patching capabilities. But with CBL-Mariner, you can have the best of both worlds. World-class server management capabilities with strong provisioning support for both Unix and Windows and the ability to skip Windows if you need.

It’s hard to overstate the complexities in patching Unix servers compared to the Windows equivalent; it’s a job often done by multiple people on the former end and sometimes handled by just one on the latter. And most people wouldn’t notice as Microsoft quietly became one of the largest Linux distributors in the world. The hard part will be winning over the community. But recent decisions, like letting GitHub live on its own without much control, may help.

It’s too early to say that Microsoft will definitely go in this direction yet, but it’s making all the right moves to enter the Linux Enterprise space. And possibly own it. Companies like Red Hat should probably take notice.

Source: Microsoft

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/92661/microsofts-new-linux-distro-is-a-warning-shot-at-red-hat/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

How to Recursively Change File Permissions in Linux

linux-file-permissions-featured.jpg Because Linux is a multi-user operating system, it has a mechanism that sets and manages file permissions to ensure that only authorized processes and users can access various directories and files. As you use Linux, you may encounter various instances where you can’t edit files or directories because of the “Permission denied” error, indicating you do not have the required privileges. This tutorial will show you how to recursively change file permissions in Linux to ensure that your permission settings apply to sub-folders and files. How to check file permission(s) in Linux When the “permission denied” error occurs… Read more14633309.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14633309/change-file-permissions-linux
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The Article Was Written/Published By: John Wachira

How to Use the lp Command in Linux to Print Files From Terminal

lp-featured.jpg Linux printing can be a bit of a challenge – especially to new users. In this tutorial, we introduce you to the lp command in Linux and show you how to use it to perform basic printing operations. We cover how to print in portrait and landscape mode, single and multiple copies, and more. The lp command: a basic introduction In Linux, the Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS) is the layer responsible for managing printer and printing options and services, including printers, printing jobs, and queues. The CUPS layer has many options to help you… Read more14622489.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14622489/use-lp-command-linux
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The Article Was Written/Published By: John Wachira

How to Fix “Repository Does Not Have Release File” Error

no-release-repo.jpg As you work with various Linux distributions, you will need to install software repositories, including third-party repositories such as Ubuntu PPAs. In most cases, the installations will work out okay. However, you may encounter the “repository does not have a release file” error as you install some software. This tutorial details what the “repository does not have a release file” error means and shows you how to solve this oft-frustrating error. What the “repository does not have a release file” error means The “repository does not have a release file” error means the third-party PPA… Read more14620518.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14620518/fix-repository-does-not-have-release-file-error
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The Article Was Written/Published By: John Wachira

PSA: Linux Doesn’t Force You to Log in to a Microsoft Account

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You may have heard (or experienced for yourself) that Windows 11 Home edition won’t let you set up your computer without signing in to or creating a Microsoft account. If that worries you, you should also know that Linux never requires anything of the sort.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/738965/psa-linux-doesnt-force-you-to-log-in-to-a-microsoft-account/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Jordan Gloor

How to Run Nmap without Root or Sudo

nmap.jpg Nmap, short for Network Mapper, is one of the most used portmapper and network scanning tools. While it is possible to run some of Nmap’s basic functions as an unprivileged/normal user, using most of its advanced features requires root or sudo privileges. For example, some advanced port scanning features like NULL, Stealth SYN Scan, and many others can only work with root privileges because Nmap needs to access raw packet data to give you adequate/usable results. Whenever you try to run such advanced features without sudo privileges, the tool will prompt you with the “requires root privileges” message…. Read more14584469.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14584469/run-nmap-without-root-or-sudo
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The Article Was Written/Published By: John Wachira

How to Use the Chown Command in Linux to Change File Ownership

chown-command-linux-featured.jpg On Linux systems, each file is associated with an owner and group owner. When you don’t have the appropriate permission, you won’t be able to access or edit the files or directory. On a Linux system, there is a “change owner” (chown) tool that allows you to change the owner of a file/directory as well as the group owner. Let’s see how you can use the chown command in Linux to better manage your files and folders. Related: How to Use Access Control Lists to Control File Permissions on Linux How to Use the chown Command in Linux … Read more14577443.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14577443/use-chown-command-in-linux
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Alain Francois

What Are Bash Dictionaries on Linux, and How Do You Use Them?

laptop-with-terminal.png?width=600&heigh
Bash dictionaries give you hash maps and associative arrays in Linux shell scripts. We’ll show you how to use these powerful and useful data structures in your own Linux shell scripts.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/730243/what-are-bash-dictionaries-on-linux-and-how-do-you-use-them/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave McKay

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