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Category: #Linux (Page 1 of 5)

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How to Create Desktop Shortcuts in Ubuntu

ubuntu-desktop-shortcuts-featured.jpg If you came to Ubuntu from Windows, you may be wondering why it’s impossible to create desktop shortcuts in Linux. The truth is that it’s not impossible, but it is somewhat more complicated. Read on to learn how to do it. Desktop Files In Linux, every application that you can launch from the desktop comes with an extra file that defines how that should happen. It’s a simple text file with a range of parameters, like the application’s name, file location, icon, and the name presented on the desktop. Those files are crucial to creating… Read more13774722.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

The Best Authenticator Apps for Linux Desktop

linux-authenticator-apps-featured-image. If you have ever used two-factor authentication before, then you have probably heard of tools like Google Authenticator. To make use of many of these services, you’ll have to have your phone near you. Luckily, there are desktop authenticator apps that can provide you with the secret key you need to log in to your account. Below are the best authenticator apps for the Linux desktop. 1. Yubico Yubico provides tokens for multi-factor authentication. It supports all services which are currently compatible with other authenticator apps, including Google Authenticator. Yubico works… Read more13770163.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: William Elcock

How to Play Android Games on Linux

android-games-linux-featured.jpg Fancy playing Android games on your desktop? We have shown you how to do so in Windows, but what about Linux? If you want to play Android games on Linux, we have the solution. Play Android Games With Anbox Anbox is essentially a version of Android running in a container. When set up, it allows you to run Android applications in an integrated manner with your operating system just like a native Linux application. This platform can be used to run Android games on Linux. Installing Anbox on Linux Currently, the… Read more13767885.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: William Elcock

How to Configure Cache-Control Headers in Apache

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Each user’s browser makes use of a built-in cache to store downloaded objects, which can significantly speed up repeat visits to your website by loading from disk rather than the network. Here’s how to configure it in Apache.

Read This Article on CloudSavvy IT ›

Source: https://www.cloudsavvyit.com/3796/how-to-configure-cache-control-headers-in-apache/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Anthony Heddings

How to Empty Your Trash Automatically in Ubuntu with AutoTrash

keep-ubuntu-clean-with-autotrash-feature Are you losing GBs of storage space because you forget to clear your trash? With AutoTrash, you can get Ubuntu to empty trash automatically on its own, based on the conditions you specify. Installation of AutoTrash You won’t find AutoTrash in many distributions’ repositories anymore. For most users, the easiest way to install it is through an unofficial snap version, available at the snap store. If using Ubuntu, which in its latest versions already supports snaps by default, you can find the program in the software center by searching for “autotrash.” … Read more13753786.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

How to Hide Desktop Icons in Ubuntu 20.04

hide-icons-in-Ubuntu-featured-e159437979 If hiding the top bar and side panel isn’t enough, and you want everything gone from your Ubuntu desktop, then you’d probably also like to get rid of those pesky icons on its surface. Read on to learn how you can hide desktop icons in Ubuntu 20.04. The extensions prefs app The latest versions of Ubuntu include by default an “Extensions” app, allowing you to modify and expand how your desktop works. You can find it among your existing apps. If it is not installed for some reason, open the terminal… Read more13747275.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

Ubuntu vs. Linux Mint: Which One Should You Use?

ubuntu-vs-mint-mint-featured.jpg Linux Mint, while based on Ubuntu, has a different approach than Ubuntu for creating a Linux distribution. Ubuntu makes use of Gnome 3 and tries to keep everything vanilla, while Linux Mint’s developers take all things they don’t like about Ubuntu and simplify it to make it easier for end users. If you are wondering which one is better, read on to find out how they differ and which one’s best for you. Note: whenever “Linux Mint” is mentioned in this article, it is referring to its Cinnamon edition. For Ubuntu, it’s referring to the vanilla 20.04 version. … Read more13735009.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

ArcoLinux Review – A Bloated Arch Linux-Based Distribution

ArcoLinux-Review-Featured-Image.jpg ArcoLinux is a distribution based on Arch Linux that was created with the aim of educating people on how to use Linux. It is also a functional distribution that you can install on your machine and use for daily work. This ArcoLinux review talks about how it works, who it is for, and whether it is recommended. Confusing ArcoLinux Many distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora have different flavors (mainly different desktop environments) of the same Linux core. ArcoLinux, on the other hand, has three different versions – ArcoLinux, ArcoLinuxB and ArcoLinuxD – which serve different needs. The… Read more13726988.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: William Elcock

How to Improve Your Linux PC Audio with PulseEffects

free-audio-upgrade-with-pulseeffects-fea Is it possible to improve your Linux PC’s audio without having to buy an expensive dedicated sound card? Say hello to PulseEffects. With PulseEffects, you can make the sound louder or apply auto-gain that “normalizes” frequencies automatically so that you can hear whispers in movies and explosions that don’t destroy your speakers. You can enhance your music’s bass levels or apply the equivalent of Creative’s “Crystalizer” effects, which can make your MP3s sound like a live concert. Related: How to Record System Sound with Pulse Audio and Audacity in Linux Install PulseEffects To… Read more13731566.gif

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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

How to Use Sudo without Password in Linux

Disable-sudo-password-featured.jpg If you’re the only one using your Linux computer, why have it continuously nag you for your password? Let’s see how you can use sudo without having to type a password each time. Note: we’ll see how to disable the sudo password in the latest version of Ubuntu. Details of the process may be different in other distributions. Edit Sudoers File To disable password checks when using sudo for your account, you must edit the “sudoers” file. It’s where access rights to thesudo command are defined for individual user accounts or user groups. It would… Read more13729670.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/use-sudo-without-password-linux/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

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