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Category: #Malware (Page 1 of 8)

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Microsoft warns of destructive disk wiper targeting Ukraine

Microsoft warns of destructive disk wiper targeting Ukraine

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

Over the past few months, geopolitical tensions have escalated as Russia amassed tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine’s border and made subtle but far-reaching threats if Ukraine and NATO don’t agree to Kremlin demands.

Now, a similar dispute is playing out in cyber arenas, as unknown hackers late last week defaced scores of Ukrainian government websites and left a cryptic warning to Ukrainian citizens who attempted to receive services.

Be afraid and expect the worst

“All data on the computer is being destroyed, it is impossible to recover it,” said a message, written in Ukrainian, Russian, and Polish, that appeared late last week on at least some of the infected systems. “All information about you has become public, be afraid and expect the worst.”

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Source: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2022/01/microsoft-warns-of-destructive-disk-wiper-targeting-ukraine/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dan Goodin

2021 was the year cybersecurity became everyone’s problem

This year marked a turning point for malicious attacks on computer systems, fueled by a rise in nation-state attacks and ransomware.

Why it matters: Once a worry mostly for IT leaders, the risk of a cyber intrusion is now a top concern for CEOs and world leaders.


Driving the news:

  • May’s Colonial Pipeline attack helped drive that message home, as did ransomware attacks on cities and hospitals — emphasizing the very real world impact that cyber attacks can have.
  • Meanwhile, the current Log4j flaw shows just how vulnerable our digital systems are. It’s a single piece of open source code, but it is used so broadly and the flaw so fundamental that it potentially opens nearly every business and government to attack.

The big picture: Evidence that cybersecurity has become the big issue abounds. Foreign Affairs devotes the current issue to the topic, while J.P. Morgan International Council identified it as the most significant threat facing businesses and government in a report released Thursday.

Between the lines: One can never permanently “win” the battle against malicious attacks, but it is possible to be losing the fight. 2021 definitely felt like a year in which the attackers had the upper hand.

  • The combination of cryptocurrency and ransomware has proven to be especially tough to fight as it is often in the business interests of a victim to pay up rather than take the risk of data loss or even a business disruption.

The rise in cyberattacks has also made for thorny diplomacy among nation states. With physical attacks, there has been a relatively clear line that acts as a deterrent, even for nations with significant conflicts. But in cyberspace, the division is murkier.

  • “The domain of cyberspace is shaped not by a binary between war and peace but by a spectrum between those two poles—and most cyberattacks fall somewhere in that murky space,” former deputy director of national intelligence Sue Gordon and former Pentagon chief of staff Eric Rosenbach wrote in a Foreign Affairs piece.
  • “In trying to analogize the cyberthreat to the world of physical warfare, policymakers missed the far more insidious danger that cyber-operations pose: how they erode the trust people place in markets, governments and even national power,” argues Hoover Institution’s Jacquelyn Schneider, in another Foreign Affairs article. “Cyberattacks prey on these weak points, sowing distrust in information, creating confusion and anxiety, and exacerbating hatred and misinformation.”

What’s next: Leaders are calling for much tighter cooperation between businesses and governments as the key way to fighting back. Also needed, many say, is an international agreement on what is and isn’t permissible, in much the way the Geneva Convention sets limits on traditional warfare.

Yes, but: The U.S. government is still woefully short of workers with needed cybersecurity skills.

Source: https://www.axios.com/2021-cybersecurity-ransomware-cyber-attack-91ccc592-b611-4825-8e0a-65e37d06a450.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Ina Fried

How Android Banking Trojans Are Slipping Past Google Play’s Defenses

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In what is a grim reminder to be careful what you install, a new bunch of Android apps have been downloaded more than 300,000 times and are stealing bank account information and draining accounts.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/771654/how-android-banking-trojans-are-slipping-past-google-plays-defenses/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave LeClair

FBI, others crush REvil using ransomware gang’s favorite tactic against it

FBI, others crush REvil using ransomware gang’s favorite tactic against it

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson)

Four days ago, the REvil ransomware gang’s leak site, known as the “Happy Blog,” went offline. Cybersecurity experts wondered aloud what might have caused the infamous group to go dark once more.

One theory was that it was an inside job pulled by the group’s disaffected former leader. Another was that law enforcement had successfully hacked and dismantled the group. “Normally, I am pretty dismissive of ‘law enforcement’ conspiracy theories, but given that law enforcement was able to pull the keys from the Kaseya attack, it is a real possibility,” Allan Liska, a ransomware expert, told ZDNet at the time.

“Rebranding happens a lot in ransomware after a shutdown,” he said. “But no one brings old infrastructure that was literally being targeted by every law enforcement operation not named Russia in the world back online. That is just dumb.”

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Source: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/10/fbi-others-crush-revil-using-ransomware-gangs-favorite-tactic-against-it/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Tim De Chant

What Is RansomCloud, And How Do You Protect Yourself?

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RansomCloud is ransomware designed to infiltrate and encrypt cloud storage. Responsibility for the security of your data isn’t as straightforward as you might think. We tell you what you need to know.

Read This Article on CloudSavvy IT ›

Source: https://www.cloudsavvyit.com/14472/what-is-ransomcloud-and-how-do-you-protect-yourself/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave McKay

This TikTok Scam Tricks Your Kids Into Downloading Malware

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Have you ever seen a scam so obvious that only a kid could fall for it? As reported by Malwarebytes, scammers on TikTok are offering “free” download codes for popular games as part of a malvertising scheme—kids are encouraged to visit a website for free games, and malware is automatically downloaded to their computer through ads.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/100592/this-tiktok-scam-tricks-your-kids-into-downloading-malware/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Heinzman

Android Users, Beware.

We’ve started seeing some almost believable malware, popping up on our Android devices. Remember never to click on ANYTHING that pops up while you’re browsing the web, no matter how much it looks like it came from your operating system or phone vendor.

We got the scary virus warning below clicking on an article on a political website TheHill.com (repeatedly, alternating with another dubious click-hole). It references a “hacking event” with yesterday’s date, and there’s even a 3 minute countdown-to-disaster timer. (HURRY! You better click NOW!) They even throw in the phone model for good measure, and it looks like it could be from Samsung, or a notice of an Android update. Yeah. Could be. But…It isn’t.

Don’t be fooled. Never click on pop ups. When in doubt, just hit BACK.

Free decryption tool to remove REvil ransomware is available

One of the worst types of malicious software that computer users worldwide are plagued with is ransomware. This type of malware encrypts the contents of the user’s computer in an attempt to force the PC owner to pay a ransom to decrypt their hard drive. Anyone impacted by the REvil ransomware can decrypt their machine for free with a master … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/free-decryption-tool-to-remove-revil-ransomware-is-available-17691271/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Satsuki Then

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