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Category: #Networks (Page 1 of 5)

How Wi-Fi 6E Works, and What It Means for Your Gadgets

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Still catching up on the last major wifi standard to be announced? Sorry, but the next one is here. Wi-Fi 6E routers are beginning to pop up, and you should know that the new standard is a more substantial jump up from Wi-Fi 6 than that ‘E’ might suggest.

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/how-wi-fi-6e-works-and-what-it-means-for-your-gadgets-1847858070
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The Article Was Written/Published By: David Nield

Your Wi-Fi May Feel Faster on a Windows 11 Laptop—Here’s Why

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Microsoft confirms that it’s adding Wi-Fi Dual Station support to Windows 11, a feature that will significantly improve wireless internet performance on laptops equipped with compatible hardware, specifically Qualcomm FastConnect modules with 4-Stream DBS. Or in plain English, your crappy Wi-Fi may feel a lot faster on a Windows 11 laptop.

With Wi-Fi Dual Station support, the Windows 11 operating system “can now leverage two concurrent Wi-Fi connections” to provide “Ethernet-like reliability and latency” over a wireless network. In most cases, that means your Dual Station-compatible laptop will utilize your router’s 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz (or 6Ghz) bands simultaneously to avoid jitter and congestion.

We expect all sorts of hardware manufacturers to take advantage of Wi-Fi Dual Station, but Qualcomm is currently leading the charge with its FastConnect systems. In a blog post celebrating the new feature, Qualcomm claimed a 4x reduction in latency when using a Windows 11 laptop with its 4-Stream DBS system with off-the-shelf Wi-Fi 6 routers.

To our surprise, Microsoft claims that Valve helped develop the Wi-Fi Dual Station system. The company has already added Wi-Fi Dual Station support to the Steamworks SDK, which many games (including CS:GO and DOTA 2) use for networking. Perhaps Valve is interested in bringing the feature to its upcoming Steam Deck, which does support Qualcomm’s FastConnect system. (Though the Steam Deck runs a custom Linux distro out of the box—maybe Wi-Fi Dual Station will come to Linux?)

If that’s not enough to convince you of Wi-Fi Dual Station’s capabilities, AMD and Qualcomm are working together to bring this tech to AMD laptops. Clearly, Microsoft and Qualcomm have developed a breakthrough solution to wireless internet latency.

But you probably won’t experience this breakthrough for a while. Wi-Fi Dual Station requires a laptop with a FastConnect subsystem that supports Wi-Fi 6 and 4-stream DBS tech. In other words, a high-end PC with a Qualcomm FastConnect 6900 or 6700 module. (You’ll also need a Wi-Fi 6 router.)

And the time of writing, your best bet is to buy one of Acer’s new Windows 11 laptops, which contain Qualcomm FastConnect 6900 modules. Lenovo says that it plans to stick these same modules in future laptops, though it hasn’t provided a release date or even a general timeline for such products.

Source: Qualcomm via PC Gamer

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/99990/your-wi-fi-may-feel-faster-on-a-windows-11-laptop-heres-why/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Heinzman

Is Your Ethernet Cable Faulty? Signs to Watch Out For

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Cables are a necessary evil and a source of many computer and network-related problems. While you can’t ditch cables entirely, some cables may need to be replaced more often than others, including Ethernet cables used for networking.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/751443/is-your-ethernet-cable-faulty-signs-to-watch-out-for/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Tim Brookes

Is It Safe to Sell My Old Modem or Router?

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If you have an old router lying around that you no longer need, you might be tempted to sell it or give it away. Fortunately, your old router is unlikely to give away any revealing information about you, but it’s a good idea to reset it before you ship it off.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/747327/is-it-safe-to-sell-my-old-modem-or-router/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Tim Brookes

Point-to-point Wi-Fi bridging between buildings—the cheap and easy way

We tested these TP-Link outdoor Wi-Fi bridges—both 2.4GHz and 5GHz versions—across 80 meters of partially wooded terrain, with great success.

Enlarge / We tested these TP-Link outdoor Wi-Fi bridges—both 2.4GHz and 5GHz versions—across 80 meters of partially wooded terrain, with great success. (credit: Jim Salter)

Extending your Wi-Fi properly from one building to another is, unfortunately, a bit of a secret art—but it doesn’t need to be either difficult or expensive. The secret lies mostly in knowing the right tools for the job. This is a job that shouldn’t involve range extenders or rely on standard Wi-Fi mesh pieces. The good news is, with the right gear, you can connect your home to an outbuilding without either professional expertise or a ditch witch and a spool of burial-grade cable.

Although the Salter household (current generation) is planted firmly in suburbia, my parents stayed rural when they moved closer to their grandkids. Their place is beautiful, but it’s the kind of home where a riding lawn mower is optional—a tractor with a bush hog is a necessity. Said tractor lives in a barn about 80 meters from the house, much of which is a moderately wooded grove. And that made it an excellent test candidate for a little DIY networking experiment.

Our goal in this exercise is not to geek out as hard as possible by mounting and aiming everything with millimeter precision. Instead, we’re simply out to demonstrate that wirelessly connecting two buildings quickly, cheaply, and easily is possible for anyone. In fact, you can even enjoy more-than-acceptable results in the end.

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Source: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/08/point-to-point-wi-fi-bridging-between-buildings-the-cheap-and-easy-way/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Jim Salter

What Is DNS, and Should I Use Another DNS Server?

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Did you know you could be connected to facebook.com—and see facebook.com in your browser’s address bar—while not actually being connected to Facebook’s real website? To understand why, you’ll need to know a bit about DNS.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/122845/htg-explains-what-is-dns/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Chris Hoffman

This WiFi 6E Router Proves Next-Gen Connectivity Is Just Too Expensive

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In home networking, bigger isn’t always better. Anyone who has spent time with the diminutive Eero or Ubiquiti AmpliFi routers can attest to this. Case in point: The Linksys Hydra Pro 6E is a pretty big router, though it doesn’t feel like it, yet it seems like Linksys put stability ahead of blasting data every which…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/this-wifi-6e-router-proves-next-gen-connectivity-is-jus-1846812993
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Wes Davis

Why a Proper Smart Home Needs a Hub

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If you’ve ever gone down the rabbit hole of smart home gadgets, you’ve probably run across devices that require a “hub.” You might think, “Why would I buy something that requires additional hardware?” I think you should seriously consider a hub.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/730467/why-a-proper-smart-home-needs-a-hub/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Joe Fedewa

Linksys’ New WiFi 6E Mesh Router Is Wildly Fast, but You Should Wait

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Although it was beaten to market by Asus’ newest ROG Rapture router, the Linksys Atlas Max 6E was actually the first WiFi 6E-certified router, having earned the distinction on Jan. 14. That means it’s also the first mesh router to garner the certification. It promises exceptional throughput, and you can expect to see…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/linksys-new-wifi-6e-mesh-router-is-wildly-fast-but-you-1846838718
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Wes Davis

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