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Category: #Networks (Page 1 of 5)

What Is DNS, and Should I Use Another DNS Server?

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Did you know you could be connected to facebook.com—and see facebook.com in your browser’s address bar—while not actually being connected to Facebook’s real website? To understand why, you’ll need to know a bit about DNS.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/122845/htg-explains-what-is-dns/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Chris Hoffman

This WiFi 6E Router Proves Next-Gen Connectivity Is Just Too Expensive

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In home networking, bigger isn’t always better. Anyone who has spent time with the diminutive Eero or Ubiquiti AmpliFi routers can attest to this. Case in point: The Linksys Hydra Pro 6E is a pretty big router, though it doesn’t feel like it, yet it seems like Linksys put stability ahead of blasting data every which…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/this-wifi-6e-router-proves-next-gen-connectivity-is-jus-1846812993
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Wes Davis

Why a Proper Smart Home Needs a Hub

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If you’ve ever gone down the rabbit hole of smart home gadgets, you’ve probably run across devices that require a “hub.” You might think, “Why would I buy something that requires additional hardware?” I think you should seriously consider a hub.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/730467/why-a-proper-smart-home-needs-a-hub/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Joe Fedewa

Linksys’ New WiFi 6E Mesh Router Is Wildly Fast, but You Should Wait

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Although it was beaten to market by Asus’ newest ROG Rapture router, the Linksys Atlas Max 6E was actually the first WiFi 6E-certified router, having earned the distinction on Jan. 14. That means it’s also the first mesh router to garner the certification. It promises exceptional throughput, and you can expect to see…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/linksys-new-wifi-6e-mesh-router-is-wildly-fast-but-you-1846838718
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Wes Davis

Internet Connection Not Working? 10 Troubleshooting Tips

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It’s useful to have a checklist of things to try when your internet is not working. Sometimes you can fix the problem yourself, while other times, it’s caused by a problem with your service provider. Here’s how to pin down and fix the problem.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/721045/internet-not-working-10-tips-to-troubleshoot-a-connection/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Tim Brookes

Linksys Launches Two New Congestion Busting Wi-Fi 6E Routers

A Linksys Altas Max 6E router in a living room.Linksys

With more and more Wi-Fi devices from smart speakers to smartphones in our homes, it’s easy to congestion issues are worse than ever. Wi-Fi 6E promises to solve that with a new communication band, and Linksys just launched the first two Wi-Fi 6E routers, the Hydra Pro 6E and the Atlas Max 6E.

If you want to be on the forefront of technology, expect to pay a pretty penny along the way. Standard Wi-Fi 6 routers already cost a lot of money, with “budget” systems still commanding over nearly $150 for a single router. But Wi-Fi 6E will cost you even more, with a starting price of $500 for a single router.

That’s because Wi-Fi 6E goes beyond Wi-Fi 6 routers. Wi-Fi 6 communicates over the same 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands as Wi-Fi 5 routers. But it uses new technology to broadcast further and device channels into smaller subchannels to avoid technology. Wi-Fi 6E has all that, plus an extra band on the 6 GHz spectrum.

The upside is, you get another band that most people probably aren’t using, thus avoiding congestion. The downside is, only Wi-Fi 6E compatible devices can connect to the new band. Everything else will connect to the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. Buying now is future-proofing for later.

Linksys Hydra Pro 6E: Tri-Band Mesh WiFi 6E Router

A Linksys Hydra Pro 6E router on a white background.Linksys

Linksys has two freshly certified Wi-Fi 6E routers for your consideration today. The first is a standalone router that can connect to other Linksys VELOP mesh routers. It’s the choice to go with if you only need one router in your home or if you want to add a big boost to a central point and prefer to layer in less expensive Wi-FI 6 or Wi-Fi 5 VELOP mesh routers elsewhere.

The Hydra Pro 6E router goes for $499.99 and is a tri-band Velop mesh Wi-Fi 6E router. It covers up to 2700 sq. ft, can handle up to 55+ devices, and provides speeds up to 6.6 Gbps which is well above what most can get from their ISPs. On the back, you’ll find a 5 Gigabit WAN port, along with four ethernet ports, and a USB 3.0 port. It uses a 1.8GHz Quad-Core processor to keep up with network-intensive tasks.

You can buy the Hydra Pro 6E from Linksys today.

Linksys Atlas Max 6E: Tri-Band Mesh WiFi 6E System

A three-pack Atlas Max 6E system on a white backgroundLinksys

If you want to go all in and don’t mind sinking $1,199.99 into your Wi-Fi system, the Atlas Max 6E is about as advanced a router you can get. It comes as a three-pack tri-band system that supports Velop mesh routers. In theory, you can purchase multiple Max 6E systems or layer in other Velop routers like the Hydra Pro or any Linksys Wi-Fi 6 or Wi-Fi 5 Velop router.

For $1,199.99, you get a truly powerful Mesh system capable of covering 9000 sq. ft. while connecting 195+ devices per node, and supporting speeds up to 8.4 Gbps. If you have a smart home, this mesh router should keep up even better than a Wi-Fi 6 system. Each node has a 5 Gigabit WAN port, four ethernet ports, and a USB 3.0 port. It uses a 2.2 GHz Quad-Core processor to handle all the devices you can throw at it.

You can buy the Atlas Max 6E from Linksys today.

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/80349/linksys-launches-two-new-congestion-busting-wi-fi-6e-routers/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

The 4 Best Wi-Fi Range Extenders

best Wi-Fi range extendersNetgear, TP-Link

Do you have a Wi-Fi router that struggles to reach every corner of the house, office, garage, or backyard? If so, you might need a range extender. A mesh system could fix the problem, but that requires replacing your entire network. Instead, get a Wi-Fi range extender to improve the existing setup you already have, that way you can work or stream Netflix from any room in the house.

What to Look for in a Wi-Fi Range Extender

As the name suggests, a range extender picks up your router’s Wi-Fi signal, then uses additional power and more antennas to boost the signal even further. Typically, the terms “Wi-Fi extender,” “booster,” and “repeater” all mean the same thing, with extender being the most popular name. Basically, it’s a mini router you can strategically plug into the wall wherever it’s needed most, then reap the benefits.

A Wi-Fi range extender is different than a Mesh Wi-Fi system, which is a slightly newer technology. With an extender, instead of buying all new gear, you simply add a boost to your current home internet setup.

  • Speed & Specs: When looking for a range extender, you’ll want to choose something that matches (or exceeds) your current Wi-Fi router. If you have a dual-band AC1200 router, get at least a dual-band AC1200 extender. That way, the extender isn’t bottlenecking the system any more than it has to. Or, if you happen to own a Wi-Fi 6 router, get a Wi-Fi 6 extender.
  • Range: Typically, extenders under-deliver on promises, but you’ll still want to pay attention to the suggested increase in range. When it says it’ll cover a 2,000-sq. ft. house, don’t expect a miracle, but definitely get an extender offering enough range for your situation.
  • Price: Finally, choose something that will fit your needs without being too expensive. If you consider spending too much on an extender, you might as well switch to a whole-home Mesh setup.

Best Overall: Netgear Nighthawk X4

Netgear X4 range extenderNetgear

The Netgear Nighthawk X4 (EX7300) is the best overall Wi-Fi range extender for several reasons, even if it’s a little pricey. It’s one of the fastest plug-in extenders around delivering stable AC2200 speeds, supports MU-MIMO technology to stream to several devices in your home, has four internal antennas, covers over 2,000 sq. ft., and has an ethernet port to hardwire something like a game console or PC.

We also love the X4’s smart roaming feature. Most range extenders don’t use the same Wi-Fi network name as what’s already in your house and instead have an “Ext” at the end. As a result, devices will disconnect from your main router and connect to the extender as you move around your home. With the Nighthawk X4, that doesn’t happen. It’s all one fast, smooth, seamless experience.

Most Future Proof: TP-Link AX1500

TP-Link WiFi 6 Range ExtenderTP-Link

Another solid option and a great Wi-Fi range extender that’s a little more future-proof is the TP-Link AX1500. This offers plenty of range, two external antennas, but more importantly, it has Wi-Fi 6. Many people still don’t have Wi-Fi 6 routers, but they’re becoming more common by the day. Without diving into what makes Wi-Fi 6 great, just know that it’s faster, broadcasts Wi-Fi signals further, won’t have as much interference, and performs better in crowded areas like apartments.

The TP-Link AX1500 will extend the range of your home Wi-Fi over 1,500 sq. ft. with quick and stable speeds, work with newer routers in the future, whether that’s a TP-Link mesh router or any Wi-Fi 6 model.

Best Budget: D-Link AC1200 Dual

D-Link Wi-Fi boosterD-Link

If you just want to get a better Wi-Fi connection in one room of the house or your garage and don’t need the best or fastest option, consider the affordable D-Link AC1200. This is a solid dual-band (2.4 and 5Ghz) Wi-Fi range extender that offers decent speeds and coverage under $50. It supports AC1200 speeds, has two external antennas you can aim for the best connection, and it still has an ethernet port if you need one. It’s a good little booster, just don’t expect it to work upstairs and across the entire house.

Best Premium: Netgear Nighthawk X6

NetGear X6 extenderNetgear

Last but not least, we wanted to recommend something a bit over the top-. It’s a premium Wi-Fi range booster unlike any other for those that need the best. The Netgear Nighthawk X6 (EX7700) is a powerful tri-band Wi-Fi range extender offering fast AC2200 speeds, fast-lane technology, two Gigabit Ethernet ports, and Netgear’s smart-roaming feature.

Smart roam ensures you only have one Wi-Fi name to look for and connect to, instead of also connecting to the extender. And with tri-band backhaul, the X6 uses one band for communicating with the main router, leaving both the 2.4 and 5Ghz bands free for 4K video streaming, gaming, and more from any area of the house. This thing is as capable as they come, but has a price tag to match.

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/75581/the-best-wi-fi-extenders/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Cory Gunther

Wi-Fi Extender vs. Mesh Network: What’s the Difference?

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Both Wi-Fi extenders and mesh networks promise to improve and extend your Wi-Fi signal, but they achieve this through different means. Plus, if you don’t purchase the appropriate system, you may find that the investment wasn’t worth it.

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Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/714781/wi-fi-extender-vs.-mesh-network-whats-the-difference/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Ian Paul

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