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Israel appears to confirm it carried out cyberattack on Iran nuclear facility

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Shutdown happened hours after Natanz reactor’s new centrifuges were started

Israel appeared to confirm claims that it was behind a cyber-attack on Iran’s main nuclear facility on Sunday, which Tehran’s nuclear energy chief described as an act of terrorism that warranted a response against its perpetrators.

The apparent attack took place hours after officials at the Natanz reactor restarted spinning advanced centrifuges that could speed up the production of enriched uranium, in what had been billed as a pivotal moment in the country’s nuclear programme.

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Source: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/11/israel-appears-confirm-cyberattack-iran-nuclear-facility
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Martin Chulov Middle East correspondent

Fort Lauderdale police mistook Star Trek memorabilia for weapons: lawsuit

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A lawsuit against the Fort Lauderdale police department alleges that officers mistook Star Trek memorabilia for weapons as part of the reason they used excessive force in arresting two brothers.T…

Source: https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/547062-fort-lauderdale-police-mistook-star-trek-memorabilia-for-weapons-lawsuit
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Lexi Lonas

“Surprisingly Soviet”: Why cable hates Biden’s $100 billion internet plan

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President Joe Biden has a $100 billion plan to ensure all Americans have high-speed internet, but some of the key companies that provide those connections are already balking.

Why it matters: Democrats on the Hill will have to overcome industry lobbying and Republican opposition to make this part of Biden’s multi-trillion-dollar infrastructure program a reality.


Driving the news: Some key details of the broadband measures in the American Jobs Plan have internet service providers up in arms.

  1. The plan prioritizes spending for government-run or nonprofit networks. Such providers have “less pressure to turn profits” and “a commitment to serving entire communities,” according to a White House fact sheet.
  2. Biden’s plan also prioritizes “future-proof” infrastructure — which providers fear means the government will fund new fiber networks in areas where broadband companies already have customers.
  3. The plan calls for making internet service more affordable by finding ways to bring prices down, instead of giving government subsidies to service providers so they can charge some consumers less.

What they’re saying: “I thought that it was really out of character the degree to which they embraced this sort of unfounded faith in government-owned networks to own, build and run this program,” Michael Powell, CEO of cable trade group NCTA and a former Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, told Axios.

  • “The idea that the private sector and profit incentives are intrinsically unsuited to do the job” is “surprisingly Soviet,” Powell added.
  • The focus on deploying fiber networks will leave rural households behind because companies will first upgrade networks in suburbs and areas that already have some service, he argues.

The other side: A Biden administration official told Axios that “future proofing” ensures rural areas aren’t left with stop-gap solutions, and that the proposal focuses on underserved areas.

  • “If we are going to put billions of public dollars behind this effort, we want to do it in a way that sets us up for decades to come,” the official said.
  • Involving community networks is a key piece of Biden’s goal of reaching 100 percent access, but the private sector will play a role as well, the official said.
  • “Having communities in the driver’s seat with this funding means that those communities have a stake, not only in articulating what the digital divide looks like on the ground, but what type of network will work best to meet their needs,” Kathryn de Wit, manager of the broadband access initiative at The Pew Charitable Trusts, told Axios.

Between the lines: Republicans were quick to oppose Biden’s plan, and moderate Democrats may also be uncomfortable with some of the measures as well.

  • “We are skeptical that a majority of the Congress wants to allocate billions to subsidize fiber networks to compete with cable,” Blair Levin, a New Street analyst and former FCC official wrote in a research note.

What’s next: The FCC is about to roll out a new subsidy program, the Emergency Broadband Benefit, to give low-income consumers $50 off their monthly internet service bill during the pandemic. More than 300 providers have been accepted into the program so far.

  • But the White House says subsidies are not a long-term solution, and cheaper service is the answer. A study from New America’s Open Technology Institute finds that Americans pay more than Europeans for internet service at comparable speeds.
  • “We’re going to drive down the price for families who have service now, and make it easier for families who don’t have affordable service to be able to get it now,” Biden said in announcing the American Jobs Plan on Wednesday.

The intrigue: The potential paths forward for reducing internet prices are not particularly appealing to providers.

  • One way would be increased competition — through government funding of competing networks. Another is government regulation of internet prices.

Source: https://www.axios.com/cable-hates-bidens-internet-access-plan-e1395560-1fff-4ba3-b19e-387e545f2263.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Margaret Harding McGill

The staying power of the stay-at-home economy

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The pandemic proved a large swath of the population can produce services and consume goods without leaving their homes — if supported by other workers.

Why it matters: We risk becoming an even more divided society — with Peloton-riding, Amazon Prime-ordering office workers living within a convenient, luxurious stay-at-home economy and essential workers servicing that lifestyle while scraping by themselves.


The big picture: Income inequality was a huge — and growing — issue before the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, but the last year widened the chasm between rich and poor.

  • In Q1 of 2020, the top 1% of Americans held 29.9% of the wealth and the bottom 50% held 1.9%. The gap grew to 31.4% for the top and 2.0% for the bottom by the end of the year, per Fed data.
  • “Let’s not kid ourselves that this is a new problem,” says Richard Reeves, the director of the Future of the Middle Class Initiative at the Brookings Institution. “The pandemic was just a flash of an X-ray bulb exposing these fractures.”

What’s happening: Remote work has become the ultimate privilege, giving those who can work from home sovereignty over time and place, Reeves says. Going to work every day used to be something of an equalizer. The pandemic dismantled that.

  • Remote office workers can come and go as they please, spend more time with family, or even work from exotic locations. In-person workers, who tend to be lower-skilled and lower-income, still have to deal with the rigidity of clocking in and clocking out — and juggling child care, health care and life around it.
  • For example, the Ford Motor Company recently announced all of its office workers can telework as often as they like. But all of the workers in production don’t have that option.

“We’re going to keep seeing this growth of home being the epicenter of life,” says Zara Ingilizian, an expert on the future of consumption at the World Economic Forum. “And not everyone will have access to this at-home future we’re discussing. That has tremendous implications.”

We’re already seeing the far-reaching effects of telework on businesses and individuals alike.

  • As the stay-at-home economy pushes independent restaurants and shops to shutter in droves, retail behemoths who can offer delivery, like Amazon, Walmart and Kroger, have had blockbuster years.
  • Jobs in hospitality and tourism are still down 25% compared with February 2020, while jobs in software development and finance are up 13% and 12%, respectively, according to the jobs site Indeed.

Yes, but: There are silver linings.

  • Flexibility was always an option for workers at the top, Reeves says. At least now it’s spreading to all workers who can telework. “I’d rather leaders have to justify that inequality rather than it being unspoken that managers can come in later than everyone else,” he says.
  • And we could see companies offer new perks to their essential workers to hold onto them. “One implication is companies feel pressure to compensate people who work in-person higher because that is now seen as a detriment,” says Jonathan Rothwell, chief economist at Gallup.

What to watch: Workers in jobs being created by the stay-at-home economy — in food delivery, warehousing and trucking — face a double whammy, says Ingilizian.

  • Many of these roles are gig jobs, without stability and with low pay. And they’re also on the automation chopping block. Per a recent WEF report, 40% of retail job activities and 54% of consumer goods production job tasks are subject to automation.
  • Automation is poised to make the inequality induced by the stay-at-home future even worse, Ingilizian says.

Source: https://www.axios.com/staying-power-stay-at-home-economy-74c6b2c7-e061-40ef-ba7b-a2a6d1a0863c.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Erica Pandey

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