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Category: #Privacy

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Facebook finally makes it way easier to trash your old posts

Facebook is introducing a new tool to help users batch-delete old posts and shrink their digital footprint on the aging social network.

Called “Manage Activity,” the new feature lets users prune their posts in bulk, making it less of a headache to delete content aging badly or anything else unnecessary that’s built up from years of using the platform. The feature will be available to some users on the Facebook app today and will roll out more broadly in the next few weeks.

“Whether you’re entering the job market after college or moving on from an old relationship, we know things change in people’s lives, and we want to make it easy for you to curate your presence on Facebook to more accurately reflect who you are today,” Facebook wrote in the tool’s announcement.

Anyone who’d like to batch-delete or archive old content will be able search their entire trove of Facebook posts using filters for dates, people tagged, and content type (photo, video, text updates, et cetera). In a preview of the tool, it looked like a vastly more useful way to control aging content without having to manually scroll through years of old posts.

Users skittish about getting rid of content permanently can opt to archive their old posts rather than deleting them outright. Archived posts stick around in a kind of purgatory, remaining viewable to their creator, like the Stories archive feature on Instagram. Deleted posts will hang out for 30 days before being wiped and users can either restore them or manually delete them from there.

In the past, users were stuck either batch-deleting old posts manually or installing third-party browser add-ons, which are notoriously rife with malware.

While it’s actually fairly shocking Facebook didn’t already have this tool, the platform’s privacy controls have a history of being somewhat fussy and difficult to navigate. Facebook has made improvements—not all voluntary—to its user privacy controls in recent years, particularly as more users wake up to the concerns of sharing vast amounts of personal data online. Old content poses similar problems and can also be a goldmine for anyone looking to compromise an account, whether for harassment purposes, identity theft or whatever else.

As social networks age, old posts and tagged content builds up, like a kind of digital plaque. For privacy purposes, scraping that stuff off regularly and cleaning things up is a good idea. And while you can’t really truly pry any information you’ve given up online away from companies like Facebook, getting more control over personal data that’s already out there is probably the next best thing.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/06/02/how-to-delete-old-facebook-posts-manage-activity/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Taylor Hatmaker

Chrome is making some huge privacy changes

Google’s Chrome browser is getting a huge privacy and security makeover, with a redesign of the settings with simplicity in mind. In addition to making controlling how Chrome handles privacy, Google is also switching up how extensions are managed, and how cookies are handled when you’re in the Incognito private browsing mode. A new “You and Google” section in the … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/chrome-is-making-some-huge-privacy-changes-19621224/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Chris Davies

Senate passes FISA renewal bill, sends it back to the House

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The Senate approved legislation Thursday to renew a handful of key domestic surveillance powers, but only after civil libertarians attached language that the Justice Department warns would “unacceptably degrade” national security.

Now the bill goes back to the House for possibly more tinkering, leaving a cloud over its chances for swift final approval.

The USA Freedom Reauthorization Act of 2020 passed the Senate by an 80-16 vote more than two months after the House approved it by a wide, bipartisan margin. But Thursday’s vote came a day after Senate privacy hawks successfully amended the bill to expand legal protections for certain groups of individuals targeted by federal surveillance — a change that DOJ labeled unacceptable.

“We appreciate the Senate’s reauthorization of three expired national security authorities,” department national security spokesman Marc Raimondi said in a statement. But he said the amended bill “would unacceptably degrade our ability to conduct surveillance of terrorists, spies and other national security threats.”

President Donald Trump, who has accused a government “deep state” of misusing its spying powers, also has not indicated whether he would sign the bill.

The vote occurred mere hours after the announcement that Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), who in March argued passionately against letting the authorities lapse, will temporarily step down as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee amid a probe into his stock trades.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi didn’t say during her weekly news conference Thursday when the chamber would take up the amended measure.

A Democratic leadership aide told POLITICO that it won’t be considered on Friday when the House convenes to vote on the latest Covid-19 relief package. The aide said the leadership was “assessing next steps.”

The FISA renewal bill includes new privacy protections that Attorney General William Barr had helped negotiate and would impose new requirements on the FISA court system. Those were inspired in part by Trump’s allegations that the Obama administration improperly used the spying tools to wiretap his former campaign adviser Carter Page during the initial probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The bill would also permanently end an already deactivated NSA program that had allowed the agency to obtain, with judicial approval, Americans’ phone records in terrorism probes.

Thursday’s successful passage came months after the House voted to reauthorize the authorities with modest changes. The Senate, however, couldn’t reach an agreement for quick passage of the House bill in March amid objections from the chamber’s privacy advocates. The chamber eventually adopted a 77-day extension as a short-term solution, but the House never took it up.

The intelligence tools the authorities enabled have remained offline ever since.

The measure now kicks back to the House, where progressives and libertarians could use the Senate’s changes as leverage to reopen debate on the legislation and try to amend it even further. That’s especially a possibility for those GOP members who have demanded that the chamber reopen for business as usual despite the pandemic.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), who along with Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) secured the amendment expanding legal protections, called the legislation a “good bill.”

“We got some good reforms here. They are consistent with many of the aims that House members who negotiated the last House bill had in mind,” Lee told POLITICO before the final vote. He had previously lobbied Trump to veto the measure if it reached his desk unaltered.

“I’m certainly not going to tell them what to do with it,” Lee added, though he suggested he might support something similar to a proposed amendment from Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.) that would have protected Americans’ internet browsing and search histories from federal surveillance. It came up just one vote shy of the 60-vote threshold.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) said the Leahy-Lee amendment “took us a step closer to properly protecting Americans’ civil liberties, and it’s clear we need to go farther.” She had successfully scuttled the House’s first surveillance package in February just hours before the House Judiciary Committee was due to mark it up.

On Thursday, she specifically cited the Wyden-Daines amendment, saying that “it’s now the House’s responsibility to curb this violation of Americans’ rights. I know it’s still within our grasp as lawmakers to push for the significant privacy reforms we need.”

Other House members also seem itching for a fresh surveillance fight.

“Although I am pleased that the Lee-Leahy Amendment passed, I oppose the bill without further amendment. If permitted by House rules, I will offer amendments,” Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) said in a statement to POLITICO. He and Lofgren co-sponsored an alternative renewal bill to the one the House passed.

Source: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/05/14/senate-passes-fisa-renewal-259064
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Martin Matishak

How to Unlock Android Phone’s Safe Folder

Featured-Unlock-Android-Phone-Safe-Folde Do you have any favorite pictures or files on a phone you don’t want others to view? On certain Android handsets, there is a built-in safe feature that allows you to encrypt and hide these private files using a pattern or PIN. Retrieving these files can sometimes be tricky, as the exact location of the safe is hidden from view in specific phones. By mistake, you may find yourself locked out of your own personal data. If you’re wondering how to recover your files from such an inaccessible Android safe folder, follow the methods below to unlock your Android safe folder…. Read more13532762.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/unlock-android-phones-safe-folder/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sayak Boral

How to secure your video calls like a pro

853b29d0-9136-11ea-ad7b-5271101c66b4Like you, I’m angry about a lot of things right now. But if you told me my future held a cyberpunk dystopia, a highly contagious viral pandemic, plus a boatload of leadership incompetence, I absolutely would not believe that one thing pissing me off…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/how-to-secure-your-video-calls-like-a-pro-190046885.html
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Children's computer game Roblox employee bribed by hacker for access to millions of users' data

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The hacker had access to personal information, the ability to change passwords and two-factor authentication, and could steal valuable in-game items from some of the ‘richest’ players in the game

Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/motherboard-rpg-roblox-hacker-data-stolen-richest-user-a9499366.html
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