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Category: #Reviews (Page 2 of 9)

PowerA’s Nano Enhanced is a compact Switch controller with pro features

ad454ae0-b78e-11ea-bf3a-20d28ed004dbPeripherals maker PowerA does a good job of making third-party gamepads — the MOGA Pro has been a bit hit with Android gamers, for example. Now, the company is launching a new controller for the Nintendo Switch. The Nano Enhanced Wireless controller…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/peripherals-maker-power-a-launches-compact-gamepad-for-the-switch-160012819.html
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macOS Big Sur: New Features, Availability, Compatibility

macOS-Big-Sur-Cover.jpg At its annual Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday, Apple introduced its latest version of macOS: Big Sur. This latest release includes major updates to the Safari web browser, refreshed Maps and Messages apps, and more. Read on to find out all about Big Sur and when it is expected to be released. UI and Control Centre macOS hasn’t had a major interface change for a long time now, and it’s good to see a new refreshing look with Big Sur. The top menu bar is now translucent and customizable. It also added more round and refined corners… Read more13684567.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/macos-big-sur-features/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Shujaa Imran

Which Ubuntu Flavor Should You Choose?

which-ubuntu-flavor-featured.jpg If you are a fan of Ubuntu but not a fan of Gnome, what can you do? You should know that you are not stuck to using the Gnome version of Ubuntu. You can install another desktop environment or simply use another “flavor” of Ubuntu that can be another desktop manager by default. Let’s see how they differ and which Ubuntu flavor would be better for you. What is Ubuntu Flavor? Ubuntu flavors are generally Ubuntu running with a different desktop environment. The default desktop environment used in Ubuntu is Gnome, but not everyone is a fan of… Read more13683601.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/which-ubuntu-flavor-should-you-choose/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

Which Ubuntu Flavor Should You Choose?

which-ubuntu-flavor-featured.jpg If you are a fan of Ubuntu but not a fan of Gnome, what can you do? You should know that you are not stuck to using the Gnome version of Ubuntu. You can install another desktop environment or simply use another “flavor” of Ubuntu that can be another desktop manager by default. Let’s see how they differ and which Ubuntu flavor would be better for you. What is Ubuntu Flavor? Ubuntu flavors are generally Ubuntu running with a different desktop environment. The default desktop environment used in Ubuntu is Gnome, but not everyone is a fan of… Read more13683601.gif

Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/which-ubuntu-flavor-should-you-choose/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feedpress.me&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+maketecheasier
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Odysseas Kourafalos

“Super Smash Bros Melee” Gets Online Multiplayer, 19 Years Later

Super smash Bros Melee screenshot

Despite coming out on a Nintendo platform near the turn of the century, Super Smash Bros. Melee is still a favorite among the hardcore fans of the series. The GameCube didn’t have much in terms of online capability, and Melee never had online multiplayer. But now a group of modders has given the game the online powers it always deserved.

It’s called Slippi, an add-on module for the popular Dolphin GameCube and Wii emulator, which is available for many operating systems. The setup includes rollback netcode, a high-performance software backbone necessary to make online matches of the super-quick Melee fights palatable to the most discerning fighting game fans. It even includes some basic matchmaking, prioritized by location for the fastest connection, and player tracking and replays are supported.

Actually using Slippi to remote play Melee with your friends is legally questionable, because it relies on emulation. (The general consensus is that, for the sake of your conscience if not the law, you should own a copy of the original game if you’re going to emulate it on your computer.) But it’s a great way for fans to play a beloved classic together, as Nintendo doesn’t seem interested in bringing many GameCube games to the Switch, and recent Smash Bros. games’ online multiplayer has been rudimentary at best.

Be aware that if you want to try Slippi, you’ll probably be thrown into the deep end of the Melee competitive scene. The current players are likely to be those who’ve been honing their skills for two decades.

Source: Slippi.GG via Kotaku

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/46191/super-smash-bros-melee-gets-online-multiplayer-19-years-later/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Michael Crider

5 Great Handheld Gaming Machines for Under $100

Evercade, Nintendo 2DS XL, and Revo K101

While you may love playing games on your home console or powerful desktop PC, those aren’t exactly portable machines. If you want to play games on the go, you’re going to need something more pocket friendly. Sure, you could just play on your phone, but there are many handheld gaming systems that offer a much better experience.

What to Look for in a Handheld Gaming System

Whether it’s running an emulator or official cartridges, a few things must be considered when selecting your system.

  • Library: The library is the most important part of any game system. Sometimes, this library will be accessed through the use of official cartridges or downloads. Other times, it will be through third-party emulators and read-only memory (ROMs). Official cartridges and downloads tend to be the simplest way to acquire games, but ROMs can provide a much larger catalog of games to play at the cost of being more complicated and, depending on how you acquire your ROMs, legally gray.
  • Compatibility: If you are going down the emulation route, you’re going to need to know what systems your new handheld can safely emulate. Some emulators struggle with certain titles, so keep your expectations in check.
  • Build Quality: While you can’t expect anything crazy in terms of build quality for less than $100, that’s not an excuse for the build quality to be straight-up bad. The build should match the price you paid, and any system you buy should feel nice to play on (because if it doesn’t, then what’s the point?).
  • Battery Life: All gaming sessions must come to an end, and if you’re playing on a handheld, that end may come from a dead battery. Obviously, longer is always better, but it is important to note that battery life will be affected by what games you play. (Basically, more intensive games burn through the battery quicker.) Most modern handhelds (and all the ones on this list) use rechargeable batteries, so we’ll be sure to note the estimated battery lives of each system—at least when the manufacturers supply one.

For the Biggest, Easiest Library: Nintendo 2DS XL

Nintendo 2DS XLNintendo

If you don’t want to worry about dusty old cartridges or deal with the inherent complications of emulators and ROMs, then the 2DS XL is the way to go. While the specs are by no means impressive, this is a Nintendo system, and Nintendo knows how to make incredible games on underpowered hardware. The 2DS XL shares the same hardware as the New Nintendo 3DS (yes, that’s the actual name, the New 3DS is a more powerful version of the original 3DS) but without the 3D screen. So, you can play any 3DS game on the 2DS XL, but it is important to note that games that make heavy use of the 3D effect (which are few and far between) might not be fully playable.

Even with that limitation, there are still plenty of games to play on the 2DS XL. From original titles like Super Mario 3D Land and Kirby Planet Robot to full remakes of classic titles like Star Fox 64 and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Timethe 2DS’s library is chock-full of quality games. And that’s not even mentioning third-party releases like Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate and Shovel Knight.

The 2DS’s library doesn’t stop with the recently released either, it fully supports any DS cartridge (which alone doubles the game library) and, with access to the eShop—Nintendo’s digital storefront—the 2DS can also play classic titles from systems like the NES, SNES, Game Boy, and even non-Nintendo systems like the Sega Genesis. The available libraries for each of those systems aren’t massive, and some systems are obviously missing (namely, the Game Boy Advance), but it’s still a good selection of retro titles.

As far as the 2DS XL itself goes, it’s what you would expect out of the DS line. A clamshell design that makes it ideal for portability, two screens that are small enough (top screen is 4.88 inches and the bottom is 4.18 inches) to make the 240p display passable, 3.5-7 hours of battery life, and a nice-looking and colorful exterior.

Overall, if you want a system with zero complications, the 2DS XL is the way to go. It is one of the pricier systems on this list, just scraping the line of being under $100, but hey, at least it comes preinstalled with Mario Kart 7 out of the box. And, who doesn’t like Mario Kart?

For Playing Old-School ROMs: PocketGo V2 and RG350

PocketGo V2 and RG350Bittboy, retromimi

If you’re willing to go down the route of ROMs, then the Bittboy PocketGo V2 is your best bet at the price point. It’s built to play any game from the pre-PlayStation era, which includes such iconic systems as the SNES, Game Boy Advance, and Sega Genesis. And, the MicroSD card slot (which supports cards up to 128 GB in size) makes it easy to load ROMs onto your system. The screen measures at 3.5 inches and displays a 240p image (which, considering the games you’ll be playing on this, is more than fine).

If you want a bit more power though, then the RG350 is the logical step up. It has a similar design to the PocketGo V2, with the ability to emulate PlayStation 1 games as well (along with all the systems the PocketGo V2 can). Unfortunately, it doesn’t support other fifth-generation consoles like the Sega Saturn or N64, but for fans of the PS1, this is a no-brainer upgrade. Same as the PocketGo V2, it supports MicroSD cards up to 128 GB in size. And, the screen is identical to the PocketGo V2’s as well.

Both of these systems are priced under $100 (with the RG350 costing about $10 more than the PocketGo V2), but they both come in a couple of different bundles that vary in price that can include accessories like carrying bags and 32 GB MicroSD cards. An aluminum version of the PocketGo V2 is also available if you want something more premium, but that increases the price to about $110.

For Playing Real Game Boy Advance Cartridges: Revo K101

Goolsky Q9Goolsky

The Game Boy Advance had some fantastic games, but if your old GBA bit the dust (or can’t deal with the non-backlit screen anymore), then the Revo K101 is the simplest way to play those old cartridges once more. Functionally speaking, the Revo K101 is basically just a Game Boy Advance clone, but with a rechargeable battery, adjustable backlit screen, MicroSD card slot (if you prefer ROMs over cartridges), and the ability to output to a TV. The build quality won’t blow you away, but it’s enough to make the K101 a viable handheld. The screen measures at 3 inches and displays a 480p image.

The Revo K101 comes in a lot of different names from different manufacturers, and you’ll probably have some trouble tracking an original model down because production was halted. The one we linked to specifically is the Goolsky Q9—one of the easier rereleases to get your hands on.

For Playing Real Game Boy Advance Cartridges

An NES You Can Fit in a Carry-On: Retro Champ

Retro ChampMy Arcade

Plenty of ways exist to play the most iconic games the NES offered today, but what about the more niche titles? Those only tend to be found in their original format: cartridges. And if you have a collection of those either sitting in storage or proudly displayed on a shelf, then the Retro Champ will allow you to play them once again. (And to be clear, the Retro Champ only supports playing with cartridges.)

The Retro Champ allows for both NES and Famicom cartridges to be slotted in and played on either the handheld itself or a TV with an HDMI cable. (Some wireless controllers are even available). The screen on the Retro Champ measures at 7 inches (resolution isn’t provided, but it’s not like you need a high-resolution screen for these games), and you can expect the Retro Champ to last about 3-5 hours on a full charge.

Besides that, there’s not much more to the Retro Champ, and there doesn’t have to be. If you want to revisit this generation of gaming in a portable and authentic way, then the Retro Champ is the best option.

For Even Older Games: Evercade

evercade with blaze introSte Knight

If you want to dive deep into the earlier days of gaming, then the Evercade is the system to buy. It’s a fantastic little system capable of running cartridges jam-packed with retro games. Simply purchase one of the game-pack cartridges off of Evercade’s site, and you’re ready to play. You can even plug your Evercade into your TV with an HDMI cable to play on the big screen.

You can play games from big-name developers like Atari and Namco, while also getting a glance at some relatively smaller developers like Interplay and Data East. There’s a decent selection of games available, so if you have a passion for this generation of gaming, you’ll have a lot to work through.

As far as the actual system itself goes, it’s pretty great for the price. The design is colorful, and all the inputs feel solid to use. The battery lasts for about 4 hours, so you’ll definitely need to charge it between play sessions.

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/45117/5-great-handheld-gaming-machines-for-under-100/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Eric Schoon

So Just How Powerful Are Apple’s New Laptop Chips Gonna Be

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Apple officially confirmed in its WWDC keynote yesterday that, yes, it would be using its own processors in its laptops and desktops. Not a terribly surprising announcement considering the rumor mill had been churning for months prior to that, but it’s nice to have Apple formally acknowledge the existence of its A12Z…

Read more…

Source: https://gizmodo.com/so-just-how-powerful-are-apples-new-laptop-chips-gonna-1844134011
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Joanna Nelius

Acer’s new high-end Chromebook is the Spin 713

38f42be0-b22d-11ea-91bb-5161002252c7Acer’s Spin 13 Chromebook is not long for this world, but the new Chromebook Spin 713 is ready to replace it. And the company’s newest premium Chromebook gets a better look, feel, and has been designed for some serious work.The Spin 713, like all Spi…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/acer-chromebook-spin-713-134500668.html
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The Best Apps for Buying and Selling Used Stuff

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If you have tons of clothing, jewelry, tech, and household gadgets just lying around, or if you’re looking to pick up something new without breaking the bank, these apps make it easy for you to buy and sell used goods.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/45311/the-best-apps-for-buying-and-selling-used-stuff/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Suzanne Humphries

iMac, Mini, and Pro: Apple’s Desktop Macs Compared

mac-mini-and-imac.jpg
If you’re shopping for a new desktop Mac, you’ll almost certainly be drawn to the iMac. However, Apple also makes the iMac Pro, Mac mini, and a freshly redesigned Mac Pro. Let’s look at the differences.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/677017/imac-mini-and-pro-apples-desktop-macs-compared/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Tim Brookes

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