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Welsh woman marks 110th birthday with viral TikTok fame

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Amy Hawkins becomes star of social networking site after great-grandson posts video of her singing

She is the oldest person in Wales and now she may be the oldest person on TikTok. Amy Hawkins has become a star of the social networking site after her great-grandson posted a video of her singing on her 110th birthday.

The former dancer made her debut on the site earlier this week singing the music hall song It’s a Long Way to Tipperary and her family have posted several videos since, including one in which she performs a dance with her 14-year-old great-grandson Sacha Freeman.

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Source: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/jan/29/welsh-woman-marks-110th-birthday-tiktok-appearance-amy-hawkins
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Kevin Rawlinson

TikTok bans videos of Trump inciting mob, blocks #stormthecapital and other hashtags

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For obvious reasons, Trump doesn’t have a TikTok account. But the president’s speeches that helped incite the mob who yesterday stormed the U.S. Capitol will have no home on TikTok’s platform. The company confirmed to TechCrunch its content policy around the Capitol riots will see it removing videos of Trump’s speeches to supporters. It will also redirect specific hashtags used by rioters, like #stormthecapitol and #patriotparty, to reduce their content’s visibility in the app.

TikTok says that Trump’s speeches, where the president again reiterated claims of a fraudulent election, are being removed on the grounds that they violate the company’s misinformation policy. That policy defines misinformation as content that is inaccurate or false. And it explains that while TikTok encourages people to have respectful conversations on subjects that matter to them, it doesn’t permit misinformation that can cause harm to individuals, their community or the larger public.

A rioting mob intent on stopping democratic processes in the United States seems to fit squarely under that policy.

However, TikTok says it will allow what it calls “counter speech” against the Trump videos. This is a form of speech that’s often used to fight misinformation, where the creator presents the factual information or disputes the claims being made in another video. TikTok in November had allowed counter speech in response to claims from Trump supporters that the election was “rigged,” even while it blocked top hashtags that were used to promote these ideas.

In the case of Trump’s speeches, TikTok will allow a user to, for example, use the green screen effect to comment on the speech — unless those comments support the riots.

In addition, TikTok is allowing some videos of the violence that took place at the Capitol to remain. For example, if the video condemns the violence or originates from a news organization, it may be allowed. TikTok is also applying its recently launched opt-in viewing screens on “newsworthy” content that may depict graphic violence.

These screens, announced in December, appear on top of videos some viewers may find graphic or distressing. Videos with the screens applied are already eligible for TikTok’s main “For You” feed, but may not be prohibited. When a viewer encounters a screen, they can just tap a button to skip the video or they can choose to “watch anyway.” (It could not provide any example of the screens in use, however.)

Anecdotally, we saw videos that showed the woman who was shot and killed yesterday appear on TikTok and then quickly disappear. But those we came across were from individual users, not news organizations. They were also not really condemning the riot — they were just direct video footage. It’s unclear if the specific videos we saw were those that TikTok itself censored or if the user chose to remove them instead.

Separately from graphic content, TikTok says it will remove videos that seek to incite, glorify or promote violence, as those also violate its Community Guidelines. In these cases, the videos will be removed as TikTok identifies them — either via automation or user reporting.

And, as it did in November, TikTok is proactively blocking hashtags to reduce content’s visibility. It’s now blocking tags like #stormthecapitol and #patriotparty among others, and redirects those queries to its Community Guidelines. There are currently redirections across dozens of variations of those hashtags and others. The company doesn’t share its full list in order to protect its safeguards, it says.

TikTok had previously blocked tags like #stopthesteal and #QAnon, in a similar proactive manner.

We should point out that for all Twitter’s posturing about safety and moderation, it allowed Trump to return to its app, after a few key tweets were deleted. And it has yet to block hashtags associated with false claims, like #stopthesteal, which continues to work today. Facebook, on the other hand, banned Trump from Facebook and Instagram for at least two weeks. Like TikTok, it had previously blocked the #stopthesteal and #sharpiegate hashtags with a message about its Community Standards. (Today those searches are erroring out with messages that say “This Page Isn’t Available Right Now,” we noticed.)

TikTok’s content moderation efforts have been fairly stringent in comparison with other social networks, as it regularly hides, downranks and removes users’ posts. But it has also been accused of engaging in “censorship” by those who believe it’s being too aggressive about newsworthy content.

That’s led to users finding more creative ways to keep their videos from being banned — like using misspellings, coded language or clever editing to circumvent TikTok policies. At other times, creators will simply give up and direct viewers to their Instagram, where their content is backed up and less policed.

“Hateful behavior and violence have no place on TikTok,” a TikTok spokesperson told TechCrunch, when we asked for a statement on the Capitol events. “Content or accounts that seek to incite, glorify or promote violence violate our Community Guidelines and will be removed,” they added.

Note: Changes to the Full-Text RSS free service

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/01/07/tiktok-bans-videos-of-trump-inciting-mob-blocks-stormthecapital-and-other-hashtags/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sarah Perez

TikTok’s latest feature highlights your favorite videos from 2020

b804bcd0-43b2-11eb-b7ff-09e10b41b8fc2020 was a rollercoaster year for TikTok. A constantly changing deadline from the Trump administration meant the company spent most of the year unsure of it would still be around to see the end of it. So can you blame ByteDance’s US outpost for wanti…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/personalized-year-on-tiktok-174013634.html
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Walmart will turn TikTok into its own home shopping network for one night

581d7c80-4079-11eb-9f7b-3babb341666bWalmart’s bid to invest in TikTok didn’t pan out, but that isn’t stopping the two from collaborating on an unusual project. As TechCrunch reports, Walmart ia hosting a “first-of-its-kind” live shopping event through its TikTok account on December 18t…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/walmart-tiktok-live-shopping-event-153921246.html
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Second federal judge rules against Trump administration’s TikTok ban

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Another federal judge has issued a preliminary injunction against U.S. government restrictions that would have effectively banned TikTok from operating in the United States.

The ruling (embedded below) was made by U.S. District Court Judge Carl Nichols in a lawsuit filed by TikTok and ByteDance against President Donald Trump, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and the Commerce Department. Judge Nichols wrote the government “likely exceeded IEEPA’s [the International Emergency Economic Powers Act] express limitations as part of an agency action that was arbitrary and capricious.”

This is the second time a federal judge has issued an injunction against Trump administration restrictions that would have prevented U.S. companies, including internet hosting services, from transactions with TikTok and ByteDance. The first injunction was granted in October by U.S. District Court Judge Wendy Beetlestone, in a separate lawsuit brought against the President Trump and the U.S. Commerce Department by three TikTok creators.

Both lawsuits challenge an executive order signed by President Trump on August 7, banning transactions with ByteDance. The order cited both the IEEPA and National Emergencies Act, claiming TikTok posed a national security threat because of its ownership by a Chinese company.

In today’s ruling, Judge Nichols wrote TikTok and ByteDance are likely to succeed in their claims that Secretary Ross’ prohibitions against TikTok and ByteDance, which were originally supposed to go into effect on November 12, likely violated limits in the IEEPA and the Administrative Procedures Act.

The Commerce Department already issued a notice last month saying it will comply with Judge Beetlestone’s injunction pending further legal developments.

ByteDance is also facing a divestiture order that would force it to sell TikTok’s U.S. operations. While it has reached a proposed deal with Oracle and Walmart, ByteDance also asked the federal appeals court to vacate the order last month. On November 26, the Trump administration extended the order’s deadline to December 4, but allowed it to lapse without setting a new one.

In an email to TechCrunch, a TikTok spokesperson said, “We’re pleased that the court agreed with us and granted a preliminary injunction against all the prohibitions of the Executive Order. We’re focused on continuing to build TikTok as the home that 100 million Americans, including families and small businesses, rely upon for expression, connection, economic livelihood, and true joy.”

A U.S. Commerce Department spokesperson said, “The Department maintains that the [executive order] is fully consistent with law and promotes legitimate national security interests.  The Government will continue to comply with the injunctions and has taken immediate steps to do so, but intends to vigorously defend the [executive order] and the Secretary’s implementation efforts from legal challenges.”

To keep track of the often overlapping developments in ByteDance and TikTok’s fight with the U.S. government, we have compiled a comprehensive timeline and will keep it updated.

TikTok vs Trump Injunction by TechCrunch on Scribd

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/12/07/second-federal-judge-rules-against-trump-administrations-tiktok-ban/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Catherine Shu

TikTok is back in Pakistan following ban due to ‘unlawful content’

04edbe20-1208-11eb-bdf7-03d6d1390b23Pakistan is removing its ban on TikTok, albeit with conditions. The country’s Telecommunication Authority has cleared the social video app after TikTok promised it would moderate clips in step with Pakistani “societal norms” and laws. People who rout…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/pakistan-lifts-tiktok-ban-131233471.html
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Snapchat launches its TikTok rival, Sounds on Snapchat

Snapchat this summer announced it would soon release a new music-powered feature that would allow users to set their Snaps to music. Today, the company made good on that promise with the launch of “Sounds on Snapchat” on iOS, a feature that lets users enhance their Snaps with music from curated catalog of both emerging and established artists.

The music can be added to Snaps either pre or post capture, then shared without any limitations. You can post it to your Story or share directly with friends, as you choose.

At launch, the Snapchat music catalog offers “millions” of licensed songs from Snap’s music industry partners, the company says.

When users receive a Snap with Sounds, they can then swipe up to view the album art, the song title, and the name of the artist. There’s also a “Play This Song” link that lets you listen to the full song on your preferred streaming platform, including Spotify, Apple Music and SoundCloud.

This differentiates Snapchat’s music feature from rival TikTok, where a tap on the “sound” takes users to a page in the app that shows other videos using the same music clip. Only some of these pages also offer a link to play the full song, however.

To kick off the launch of the new Snapchat music feature, Justin Bieber and benny blanco’s new song “Lonely” will be offered as an exclusive in Snapchat’s Featured Sounds list today.

Music makes video creations and communication more expressive, and offers a personal way to recommend music to your closest friends,” notes the company, in announcement about the feature’s launch.

Snap had said in August it would begin testing the new music feature and detailed the deals that made the addition possible.

To power Sounds on Snapchat, the company forged multi-year agreements with major and independent publishers and labels, including Warner Music Group, Merlin (including their independent label members), NMPA, Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner Chappell Music, Kobalt, and BMG Music Publishing.

The move to introduce a music feature is meant to counter the growing threat of the ByteDance-owned TikTok app, which has popularized short-form video sharing with posts set to music from a large catalog.

Though TikTok’s future in the U.S. remains uncertain due to the ever-changing nature of the Trump administration’s TikTok ban (and an election that could upset those plans), it still remains one of the top U.S. apps, with around 100 million monthly active U.S. users as of August. (TikTok is currently engaged in a lawsuit to challenge its ban, so the app remains live today.)

Social media companies have capitalized on the chaos surrounding a possible TikTok U.S. exit to promote their alternatives, like Triller, Dubsmash, Byte, and others, including, of course Instagram Reels.

Snapchat, meanwhile, touts its traction with a younger user base as its new music feature goes to launch.

In the U.S., Snapchat now reaches 90% of all 13-24 year-olds, which the company notes is more than Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger combined. It also reaches 75% of all 13-34 year-olds and, o average, more than 4 billion Snaps are created every day.

The feature is live now on iOS to start.

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Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/15/snapchat-launches-its-tiktok-rival-sounds-on-snapchat/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sarah Perez

TikTok down: App not working amid bug that empties people’s profiles and asks them to change username

TikTok briefly stopped working properly as users found their profiles empty and the app asking them to change their username.

Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/tiktok-down-app-not-working-username-bug-profile-empty-b989489.html
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Griffin

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