Proactive Computing | Optimizing IT for usability, performance and reliability since 1997

Category: #Updates (Page 1 of 4)

Auto Added by WPeMatico

What’s New in Windows 10’s 20H2 Update, Arriving Fall 2020

windows-10-new-light-start-menu-tiles.pn
Windows 10’s 20H2 update will debut in the second half of 2020—likely in October or November. This update is focused on bug and performance fixes, but it has some larger changes—like the removal of the System Control Panel.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/684812/whats-new-in-windows-10s-20h2-update-arriving-fall-2020/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Chris Hoffman

Twitter now lets everyone limit replies to their tweets

GettyImages-1055352580.jpg?w=601

Twitter may describe itself as the town square, but that doesn’t mean you have to talk to everyone walking past your seat at the cafe. Today, to increase the amount of “meaningful conversations” that take place on Twitter, and to help people weed out abuse and spam in their replies, the company announced that it is rolling out a new feature where users can limit who replies to their Tweets.

After a brief run in beta, the feature is rolling out globally starting today to users of the iOS and Android apps, as well as twitter.com, Suzanne Xie noted in a blog post announcing the feature. TweetDeck is not yet supported, Twitter tells me.

A small globe icon will start to appear at the bottom of your tweet, and if you do nothing, everyone will still be able to reply — this is the default option. Or, you can tap it and limit replies just to those who follow you; or just to those who you tag in the tweet itself.

And, if you pick the third of these and tag no one, it’s also a way to broadcast a tweet or a thread of tweets with no replies at all. (This all applies to “open” accounts; those that have locked who can view their tweets are limited by default; and it doesn’t seem to replace the option to hide replies, which Twitter launched last year. We asked and Twitter declined to make any update or statement on the “hide replies” functionality.)

Those who can’t reply will get a greyed-out icon, but they can still view, retweet, retweet with comment and “like” the tweets.

The basic idea behind limiting replies is more control. Specifically, setting parameters around those who can reply can help the original poster curtail abusive or trolling replies, or to limit replies to keep the conversation on track. Both can be especially critical in a number of use cases common on Twitter. Those tweeting about a sensitive issue or a political topic are classic scenarios that bring out trolls. And those trying to broadcast a conversation with a specific group (or indeed in a monologue) with the intention of making that conversation publicly viewable can now do it without interruption.

“Sometimes people are more comfortable talking about what’s happening when they can choose who can reply,” Xie wrote. “We’ve seen people use these settings to have conversations that weren’t really possible before. Starting today, everyone will be able to use these settings so unwanted replies don’t get in the way of meaningful conversations.”

Xie said that beta test feedback has been positive. Those using the feature said they felt more comfortable and protected from spam and abuse, and the feature is getting used: It found that those who have submitted abuse reports and had access to the new limit reply tool were three times more likely to use the settings.

It seems that limiting replies is more of a complement to, not a replacement for, muting and blocking: 60% of those using the limit replies feature weren’t already muting and blocking other users. Xie doesn’t mention how it is used alongside another spam-controlling feature Twitter launched last year, hiding replies.

People who are limited from replying directly can still retweet with a comment, and thus still inject whatever they want to say. But Xie noted that “these settings prevented an average of three potentially abusive replies while only adding one potentially abusive retweet with comment,” adding that there was no uptick in unwanted direct messages, either.

The feature getting announced today has been a while in the making, both from a product and even longer from an idealogical point of view.

The concept for limiting replies was first announced back at January at CES, when Kayvon Beykpour, Twitter’s VP of Product said that the primary motivation [for the feature] was control. “We want to build on the theme of authors getting more control and we’ve thought … that there are many analogs of how people have communications in life,” he said at the time.

The feature then formally started to roll out in a limited test in May, and the version that is getting turned on today looks just like that. (In fact, the screen shots are exactly the same, except with a more recent date on the tweets.)

But the bigger thinking behind the new feature stretches back earlier than this year.

Twitter has long (as in years now) been working on creating better ways to channel its open-ended social platform to keep it from getting exploited and abused.

The issue stems from the platform’s basic DNA: Twitter was built around the idea of anyone being able to reply to anyone else, regardless of whether two users follow each other, or whether someone wants to hear a certain response. The issue, some argue, is that Twitter has dragged its feet because the open-ended aspect is actually in Twitter’s best business interest, since it encourages more engagement and use. (For a recent example of that argument pertaining specifically to cancel culture conversations, see here.)

Admittedly, it can be one of the more empowering feelings you can have on this big internet of ours, to be able to reply to someone on Twitter when you have an opinion on something, or just a question. Never mind that the reply may never come, or come from an army of trolls. And indeed, that open-ended aspect hasn’t always played out as a positive every time.

People, some of whom might be vulnerable or going through difficult situations, can be singled out for negative responses by other users, leading some of them to leave Twitter altogether, sometimes in very high-profile incidents. At a time when social media has become ever more influential and is being criticized by many asking whether it is fair enough, responsible enough and responsive enough in relation to the (incendiary and other) content that bounces around its playing fields, it has been a bad look for Twitter, and it’s been trying for years now to fix it. 

I’m guessing that some will decry the move to limit replies as a curtailing of free speech and free expression, that it might give a stronger voice to those who are actually using Twitter to disseminate abusive information themselves, by potentially limiting how people can respond.

There are a couple of counter arguments, though. One is that people can still see and retweet what someone says, one way of responding. A retweet with comment can still be pretty powerful: Sometimes these tweets can go viral and be seen even more than the original tweets themselves.

Xie noted that people will be able to see when replies have been limited, and that Twitter is working on ways of making that more obvious. That might well include pointing people to further information elsewhere. And the new timeline containing “Retweets with Comments” launched in May gets four times more visits on Tweets using these settings, Xie said.

There have, in fact, been a number of tweaks to reduce the amount of noise on the platform: Last year Twitter turned on the ability to hide replies, and over the years Twitter has improved the process for reporting harassment (including a number of updates and tests around harmful language), blocking people (although it seems this has some people contesting it) and muting people.

And it’s worth pointing out that Twitter has been making a lot of efforts to better detect and help users report original tweets that are abusive, discriminatory, contain fake news and the rest.

That might be the most important point here. This is a net positive for the platform, but still just one step in a long journey to work on improving the climate on Twitter overall.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/08/11/twitter-now-lets-everyone-limit-replies-to-their-tweets/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Ingrid Lunden

Android 11 Will Not Display Album Art on Your Lock Screen

c042f8b9.png
Google recently confirmed that Android 11’s lock screen will not display album art when you’re playing music on your device. The feature is one of many changes being made for the new OS, and in this case, that is specifically affecting media playback.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/50018/android-11-will-not-display-album-art-on-your-lock-screen/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Suzanne Humphries

How to Update Microsoft Office Apps on Windows 10 and Mac

office-logo.jpg
Software updates are essential in keeping your applications up to date with the latest features, performance improvements, and security patches. Microsoft regularly provides updates for its Office suite. Here’s how to check for, and install, Microsoft Office updates.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/681059/how-to-update-microsoft-office/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Marshall Gunnell

Facebook Is Rolling Out Live Broadcasting to Messenger Rooms

Four poeple live broadcasting in a Messenger Room.Facebook

Recently, Facebook unveiled Messenger Rooms, its take on Zoom-like video chat. It supports up to 50 callers, and you join through Messenger or a shared link on Facebook. Now, Facebook is rolling out the ability to live broadcast your Messenger Room, so anyone can see the call without joining.

As the pandemic continues, we’ve begun to use video conferencing in new and interesting ways. You’ll find table reads of episodes of Community or casts from movies like Lord of the Rings reuniting over video calls and broadcast for everyone to see.

Facebook built its new Messenger Room feature for those kinds of scenarios. Perhaps you have a book club meeting and belong to a book lovers group that would find interesting. Or you want to reenact a favorite scene for all your friends. All you need to do is start a room and then broadcast it to your profile, page, or group and invite people to watch. Anyone can then watch the Room chat without joining the room and directly participating.

Facebook did put in a few sensible restrictions. Only the Messenger Room creator can decide to broadcast. And before the broadcast begins, everyone in the Room has to agree to the live stream, or leave if they don’t want to participate.

The Room creator can add or remove participants at any time, and participants can choose to leave at any time as well. That should prevent anyone from getting stuck in a live stream. Facebook says the feature is rolling out now in “some countries” and plans to roll out to all countries that support Messenger Rooms eventually.

Source: Facebook

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/48454/facebook-is-rolling-out-live-broadcasting-to-messenger-rooms/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

Facebook Messenger Will Get New Privacy Settings

A blurred out Facebook messenger app with app lock enabled.Facebook

Facebook Messenger plans to introduce new privacy settings to lock down who can message you. Soon you can prevent people from messaging or calling you at all or always shunt them to the requests box. Facebook is also introducing App Lock to protect your private messages better.

App Lock is a simple (and optional) addition to Messenger. The idea is, you may need to let a family member or friend borrow your phone. But that doesn’t mean you want them to see your private messages. With App Lock turned on, you’ll have to fingerprint or face authentication to unlock the Messenger app.

The feature uses the phone’s security settings, which means Facebook doesn’t get access to your fingerprint or face profiles. Facebook says the feature is rolling out to users now.

The company plans to offer new privacy settings in the future as well. When that update releases, you’ll have more control over who can message you. Facebook says “you can decide who can message or call you directly, who goes to your requests folder, and who can’t message or call you at all.” The new settings will resemble Instagram’s privacy settings.

Facebook didn’t say when the new privacy settings would arrive, only that it would share more details soon.

Source: Facebook

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/48362/facebook-messenger-will-get-new-privacy-settings/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

Google Chrome update limits cookie tracking and blocks annoying notifications

27247780-7f1a-11ea-b7de-e90da267c6cfGoogle’s Chrome 84 is now available for all desktop users after a delay in releases due to the coronavirus pandemic. The version resumes the SameSite cookie changes Google started implementing with Chrome 80. If you’ll recall, the tech giant had to r…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/chrome-84-resumes-samesite-cookie-changes-073511129.html
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By:

Facebook Is Rolling Out Dark Mode to Mobile

The Facebook app in dark modeNotFridayCraig

If you’re on desktop, you can already get Facebook on dark mode, but what if you’re on iOS or Android? If you’re one of a few lucky iOS users, you can get dark mode on Facebook today. But very few users have the option yet, and there’s no word on Android.

Some people love dark mode, and it’s easy to see why. Implemented correctly, it’s easier on the eyes, and for some devices, it also extends battery life. Facebook already has a dark mode for Messenger, Instagram, WhatsApp, and its desktop interface. But mobile didn’t get the same attention until now.

So I have dark mode on Facebook now. 😍 #darkmode #facebook #iOS14 pic.twitter.com/AuC5uYoMJ2

— 🐍🏀💜💛 (@NotFridayCraig) June 26, 2020

As spotted by SocialMedia Today, a few users found a new dark mode option on the Facebook iOS app. You see screenshots and examples on Twitter. When SocialMedia reached out to Facebook, the company confirmed that it released the feature for “a small percentage of users globally right now.”

The company didn’t say when it would start rolling out the feature more widely or when Android users would get the option. But if you want to check if you’re one of the lucky chosen few, head to your Facebook app settings. The rest of us will have to wait.

via SocialMedia Today

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/46326/facebook-is-rolling-out-dark-mode-to-mobile/
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

Waze lets drivers display their moods in the app

58a47a10-b7b1-11ea-b6ff-469ea92a82b9In the past year, Waze has added a handful of useful features like lane guidance, COVID-19 info, alerts when a road is unplowed, YouTube Music integration and Google Assistant compatibility. But it’s been several years since Waze updated its design….

Source: https://www.engadget.com/waze-design-brand-refresh-moods-130054677.html
Proactive Computing found this story and shared it with you.
The Article Was Written/Published By:

« Older posts