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Favicons Could Be the Supercookie That Tracks You Everywhere

As Apple prepares to launch its anti-tracking update for iOS, Facebook and other companies that have built their business on invading users’ privacy are nervous about the future. But there’s always a new vulnerability waiting to be discovered. For instance, researchers now claim that a website’s favicon can be used to…

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Source: https://gizmodo.com/favicons-could-be-the-supercookie-that-tracks-you-every-1846229089
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Rhett Jones

Wikipedia’s new code of conduct targets harassment and misinformation

4207e270-6589-11eb-95aa-bdbfa77bcf2dThe Wikimedia Foundation has announced the first Universal Code of Conduct to tackle misinformation and harassment on Wikipedia. The foundation says that the rules clearly spell out what behavior is acceptable. The code explicitly prohibits Wikipedia…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/wikipedia-universal-code-of-conduct-misinformation-harassment-192659211.html
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How to Install and Use Composer, PHP’s Dependency Manager

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Composer is the PHP community’s go-to dependency manager. It simplifies installing, updating and using third-party packages. Packages can be hosted by public and private repositories, with most popular projects publishing to Packagist.

Read This Article on CloudSavvy IT ›

Source: https://www.cloudsavvyit.com/9125/how-to-install-and-use-composer-phps-dependency-manager/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: James Walker

How to Add Read More to WordPress

This wikiHow teaches you how to add a “Read More” or “Continue Reading” link to your WordPress.com blog post. The Read More link is a great option for when you don’t want the entirety of your blog post to appear on your main blog page. You can control where the link appears on the page, and in some cases, you can even change “Read More” into your own custom text.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Using the Visual Editor

  1. Open the post you want to edit. You’ll usually want to include a Read More link on longer blog posts.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 1.jpg
  2. Click the where you want to insert the More break. To do this, hover your mouse cursor just below the block under which you want “Read More” to appear. When the plus sign appears, click it to add a new block.[1]
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 2.jpg
  3. Type into the search field. A list of search results will appear under “Layout options.”
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 3.jpg
  4. Click in the search results. This adds a horizontal dashed line with the words “READ MORE” at the center. Everything below this line will only appear on the page once the reader clicks the Read More or Continue Reading button.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 4.jpg
    • The text of the Read More link will vary by WordPress theme. Depending on the theme and your account type, you may be able to change the text by clicking at the center of “READ MORE” and typing your own phrase.
  5. Click the button. Now you can refresh your blog’s main page to see the “Read More” link.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 5.jpg

[Edit]Using the Code Editor

  1. Open the post you want to edit. If you prefer coding your WordPress blog entries in the built-in WordPress code editor, you can enter a Read More tag manually.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 6.jpg
    • To switch from the visual editor to the code editor, click the three horizontal dots at the top-right corner and select Code editor in the “EDITOR” section.
  2. Click the mouse cursor on the line you want “Read More” to appear. The Read More link should go directly below the part of your post that you want to appear on your blog’s main page. The part of the post above the Read More code is called the “teaser” text.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 7.jpg
  3. Type the Read More code. Type each of the following strings of code on their own separate lines:
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 8.jpg
  4. Click the button. Now when you refresh your blog, you’ll see a Read More or Continue Reading link below the teaser text. When the reader clicks the link, they’ll be able to see the entire blog post.
    Add Read More to WordPress Step 9.jpg
    • Depending on your account type, you may be able to change the text of the Read More link. In the second line of the above code, add the desired text after the word “more” like this: .[2]

[Edit]Tips

  • If the Read More link isn’t appearing on your main blog page, click the Customize link in the toolbar, select Content Options, and select Post Excerpt.
  • If you’re still not able to get the Read More link to work, the theme you’re using likely doesn’t support the feature.

[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]References

[Edit]Quick Summary

Source: https://www.wikihow.com/Add-Read-More-to-WordPress
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Should You Use React for Your Next Website?

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React has surged in popularity in recent years. Described as “a JavaScript library for building user interfaces,” React’s declarative approach to rendering simplifies the construction of complex UIs.

Read This Article on CloudSavvy IT ›

Source: https://www.cloudsavvyit.com/8769/should-you-use-react-for-your-next-website/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: James Walker

Adobe Flash Is Dead, and It’s About Time

A laptop with the Flash logo on the screen. monticello/Shutterstock

If you’re trying to access anything Flash-related today, first off, why? But secondly, it’s probably not working. That’s because Adobe cut off support for Flash at the end of 2020, and while it plans to block Flash starting on January 12, major browsers aren’t waiting. Beginning January 1, most browsers will block Flash entirely, as will Microsoft in most versions of Windows. Flash is dead, as it should be.

If nothing else, Steve Jobs was often ahead of his time and brought about change through touchscreens and other design revolutions. Another notch on his belt is the early doom of Flash. After his highly publicized “Thoughts on Flash” criticizing the platform, it never really recovered.

And that’s fine! HTML5 essentially replaced Flash years ago, and every major browser supports it. But it does feel like a cultural loss. A decade or so ago, graphic designers spent months mastering Flash to create sites, games, and more. It brought us entertaining content like Homestar Runner (ok, let’s be honest, Strong Bad), Ishkur’s Guide To Electronic Music, and more. Some of those sites still work best in Flash.

But they’ll either have to update or get left behind, and even Homestar Runner seems to be adapting through its YouTube channel. Flash is ultimately an insecure protocol, and we’re better off without it. But it’s ok to remember where the internet started as we look ahead to where it’s going.

Source: Adobe

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/66236/adobe-flash-is-dead-and-its-about-time/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

This quick and clever tool creates an instant homepage for your podcast

Podcast homepages weren’t something I gave any thought to until I launched my own standalone show. And honestly, even then I probably didn’t give enough thought to the subject. For that reason, many or most of my shows have Tumblr pages — which is, at best, a bit of a mixed blessing in 2020.

The biggest reason many podcasters give little consideration to the subject is the fact that most people are platform-dependent when it comes to listening. People who consume a lot of podcasts generally do so through a single platform/app, be it Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, Stitcher, Castbox, etc. But when it comes to actually promoting your show on social media, you’re best served by sharing a link that’s platform agnostic.

I’ve been playing around with Podpage a bit today. The new offering was created by Brenden Mulligan, co-founder of app developer toolbox LaunchKit, which sold its tools to Google way back in 2016. The offering has been around for a while now, but Mulligan has offered some updates and recently listed it on ProductHunt.

I’m digging it so far. It’s basically plug-and-play to get up and running, though you can customize a fair bit beyond that. For reference, a simple page I made this morning for my podcast, RiYL:

Image Credits: Brian Heater

After a couple of hours, I’m pretty seriously considering dropping the long-standing Tumblr in favor of the service. My page is pretty simple so far, and honestly, that’s by design. Or, rather, partially by design and partially due to the fact that I haven’t been very good about updating episode art, which has kind of limited my options here (perhaps I’ll go through the 400+ episodes on some future rainy day).

You start by entering your podcast name, and the service goes to work, scraping the relevant information and building it into a page. From there, you can add a Patreon (or other method for monetization) and all related social media. One of the nice things about having a purpose-built service like this is how it pulls together all of the relevant information into a single spot. The sidebar features a breakdown of the different podcatchers where you can listen to the show, coupled with a signup form to get show updates.

On the bottom are a selection of reviews from different podcasting services. Up top is a link to the services where you can leave that feedback. There’s also a subscription link and contact form, which is a handy way of allowing people to email you without giving out personal information. Notes submitted to the form will be sent to your associated email.

The basic experience is free and there are currently two upgrade options. At $5 a month, you can host it on your own website and for $12, there are a bunch more customization options, along with a more fully featured website, including blog functionality and the ability to add transcripts.

Note: Changes to the Full-Text RSS free service

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/12/29/this-quick-and-clever-tool-creates-an-instant-homepage-for-your-podcast/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Brian Heater

Amazon Web Services outage is affecting major sites and apps

d3bf58c0-a701-11ea-a7fb-4f8b8803f5b9If you’re having trouble with some websites and apps at the minute, you’re far from the only one. Amazon Web Services (AWS), which powers a huge number of internet services, is in the midst of an outage in one of its regions.DownDetector, which track…

Source: https://www.engadget.com/amazon-web-services-aws-outage-180852407.html
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