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Windows 11 Will Get Taskbar Clocks on Multiple Monitors Soon

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Microsoft has announced Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22509, and it brings with it some much-needed taskbar and start menu improvements, including showing the clock on multiple monitors.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/772072/windows-11-will-get-taskbar-clocks-on-multiple-monitors-soon/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave LeClair

Windows 11 Has a God Mode, Too—Here’s How to Activate It

Windows 11 logo on the Windows 11 default wallpaper.Microsoft

Tired of digging through your Settings and Control Panel just to reach your backup tools or change your system’s clock? Like previous Windows releases, the Windows 11 operating system features a secret “God Mode” that gives you a desktop shortcut to over 260 management settings.

The Windows God Mode, officially referred to as a “Master Control Panel,” made its debut with Windows 7. While God Mode doesn’t add any new controls to your PC, it gives you instant access to management settings, all of which are organized in straightforward categories and accompanied by a search function.

How to Enable God Mode on Windows 11

Activating God Mode on Windows 11 is easy. In fact, How-To Geek‘s detailed God Mode guide will help you set it up on any version of windows (minus Vista and earlier releases). But for those who don’t feel like reading a detailed guide, here’s how to set up God Mode nice and quick.

Using an account with administrator privileges, right click your desktop, hover over “New Item,” and select “Folder.” An empty folder icon should appear on your desktop.

Right click this folder, click “Rename,” and paste this string of crazy nonsense into the highlighted text field.

GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

Hit enter after renaming the empty folder. It should transform into a Control Panel icon with the name God Mode. Double-click this icon to bring up the “Master Control Panel” and start tweaking your PC settings one by one.

If you want your God Mode icon to have a different name, copy the above code and make a new folder on your desktop. Rename the folder, paste in the above code, and edit the part that says “GodMode” with a new name, like “Review Geek Mode.” (Leave the period before the “{” or this wont work.)


While God Mode is fun and all, be sure to avoid any settings that you don’t understand. You should also try searching for settings from the Start menu if you don’t feel like looking through the massive God Mode list.

Source: How-To Geek

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/103171/windows-11-has-a-god-mode-too-heres-how-to-activate-it/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Heinzman

How to Send Large Files Through Outlook

Whether you’re sending email in the desktop version of Outlook or through Outlook.com, you’ll run into size limits when trying to attach large files. Outlook won’t allow you to send a message that’s larger than 20 MB through web-based email servers like Outlook.com or Gmail, or larger than 10 MB when sending through an Exchange server. So what happens when you need to get a large file to someone right away? You can still send the file by first uploading it to OneDrive. Or, if you’re trying to send photos that are too large through the desktop version of Outlook, you can also use Outlook’s image size reducer to shrink them. A third way is to compress the file(s) into a ZIP file, which will usually reduce its size.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Uploading to OneDrive

  1. Sign in to https://www.onedrive.com. Because email servers limit the size of attachments, you’ll want to upload your file to cloud service and then include a link to the file in your email message.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 1.jpg
    • You get 5 GB of space on OneDrive for free with a free Microsoft account. If you subscribe to Microsoft 365, you’ll have 1TB of space, and can upload files up to 250 GB.
    • If you’d prefer, you can use a different cloud drive service, such as Dropbox or iCloud, instead of OneDrive.
  2. Click the button. It’s at the top of your file list. A menu will expand.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 2.jpg
  3. Click on the menu. This opens your computer’s file browser.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 3.jpg
  4. Select the large file and click . This uploads the file to OneDrive. You can watch the progress at the top-right corner of OneDrive.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 4.jpg
  5. Select the uploaded file and click . You’ll see this at the top-left corner of the file list.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 5.jpg
  6. Click . This saves a direct link to the large file to your computer’s clipboard.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 6.jpg
  7. Paste the file into the email message in Outlook. Whether you’re using Outlook.com on the web or the Outlook app on your computer, you can paste the URL you copied into the body of the message. Just right-click the location in the message where you want to insert the link and select Paste.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 7.jpg
  8. Send the message. When the recipient receives the message, they’ll be able to download the large file by clicking the link you included.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 8.jpg

[Edit]Reducing Image Size in Outlook 365

  1. Attach the large photo(s) to your email message in Outlook. If you’re using the Outlook application on your computer and want to share large photos, you can tell Outlook to make the images smaller when sending.[1]
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 9.jpg
    • To attach files in an Outlook message, click the paperclip icon at the top of the new message, select Browse This PC, choose the file(s), and then click Open.
  2. Click the menu and select . The File menu that you need to click is the one that’s on the new message, not the one at the top of Outlook. You’ll see an Info menu option at the top of the File menu when expanded.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 10.jpg
  3. Select . It’s the first option in the yellow box under “Image Attachments.”
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 11.jpg
  4. Click the back button to return to your email message. Now that you’ve told Outlook to reduce the size of the attached image(s), you should be able to send the message without error.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 12.jpg
    • If you can’t get the images small enough to send this way, send multiple email messages with a few images attached to each, or upload them to OneDrive instead.

[Edit]Compressing Files Before Sending

  1. Open File Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac). If you’re trying to send a file (or group of files) that are too large to attach to an email, you may be able to reduce the size of the file by compressing it into a ZIP file. The recipient can then unzip the file to view what’s inside.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 13.jpg
    • To open File Explorer for Windows, click the folder icon in the taskbar, or press Windows key + E.
    • To open Finder for macOS, click the two-toned smiley face icon on the Dock.
    • Some mail servers won’t allow you to attach a ZIP File to an email. If you get an error about attaching a ZIP file, try using OneDrive instead.
  2. Go to the folder where you’ve saved the large file(s). For example, if your large files are photos, you can open your Photos or Pictures folder.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 14.jpg
    • Compressing files that are already in compressed formats, such as MP3, JPG, or MP4, will typically not reduce the file size by much. This method will work best for uncompressed files such as large Adobe documents, uncompressed video, and images in the RAW format.
  3. Select the file(s) you want to compress. To select multiple files, hold down the Control (PC) or Command (Mac) key as you click each file.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 15.jpg
  4. Add the selected file(s) to a compressed ZIP file. The steps are a little different depending on your operating system:
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 16.jpg
    • Windows: Right-click the selected file(s), choose Send to on the menu, and then select Compressed (zipped) folder.
    • macOS: Press Control as you click the selected file(s) and choose Compress from the menu.
  5. Check the size of the new ZIP file. Once you compress the files into a ZIP, a new file ending with the “.zip” extension will appear in the same folder you’re in. You’ll want to make sure it’s fewer than 10 MB if you’re sending it through an Exchange server, or 20 MB if sending through most other types of mail servers. Here’s how to check its size:
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 17.jpg
    • Click the file ending with .ZIP once to select it.
    • If you’re using a Mac, click the File menu and select Get Summary Info.
    • If you’re using Windows, right-click the file and select Properties.
  6. Attach the ZIP file to an email in Outlook. You can do this using the desktop version of Outlook or Outlook.com on the web. Just click the paperclip icon at the top of the message, select Browse this Computer or Browse this PC, choose the file, and then click Open. If the file is smaller than the maximum, the message will send as normal.
    Send Large Files Through Outlook Step 18.jpg
    • If you’re still unable to send the message after compressing the file, or Outlook won’t let you attach a ZIP file to an email, you could try uploading the file to OneDrive or another cloud drive instead.

[Edit]References

[Edit]Quick Summary

Source: https://www.wikihow.com/Send-Large-Files-Through-Outlook
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Finally: Windows 10 Won’t Get Big Updates Every Six Months

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With Windows 11, Microsoft realized that significant updates every six months are too frequent, so the company switched to annual updates. The company is officially switching to the same update schedule for Windows 10, so you won’t get underwhelming feature updates as often.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/769318/finally-windows-10-wont-get-big-updates-every-six-months/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave LeClair

How to Hide OneDrive Images in the Windows 11 Photos App

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In Windows 11, when you link your Microsoft account with your PC, the Photos app automatically shows the images from your OneDrive storage. If you’d like to hide these OneDrive images in Photos, you can. We’ll show you how.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/763347/how-to-hide-onedrive-images-in-the-windows-11-photos-app/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Mahesh Makvana

You Can’t Reinstall Windows 11 SE if You Remove It

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After announcing Windows 11 SE, Microsoft released some documentation describing the OS. It was discovered that there’s no going back once you remove Windows 11 SE and replace it with Windows 11.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/768252/you-cant-reinstall-windows-11-se-if-you-remove-it/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Dave LeClair

Microsoft Is Finally Making a Chromebook Rival, but It Might Be Too Late

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Today Microsoft announced the first true Chromebook competitor we’ve seen with the $250 Surface Laptop SE, a cheap Windows 11 laptop with entry-level specs. It’s perfect for students, and it’s exactly the kind of machine Google and Chrome OS device makers have been churning out for years. Why now?

Read more…

Source: https://gizmodo.com/microsoft-is-finally-making-a-chromebook-rival-but-it-1848027384
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Florence Ion

Microsoft OneDrive app will stop syncing with Windows 7 and 8 on March 1st, 2022

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Microsoft is trying to nudge more people toward newer Windows versions. As Thurottreports, Microsoft has warned that the OneDrive desktop app will stop syncing with personal Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 computers on March 1st, 2022. The software will no longer receive updates from January 1st onward. You can still use the web to manually transfer files, but that’s clearly a hassle if you routinely access cloud files from an older PC.

Business customers won’t have much of a reprieve, either. Microsoft is tying corporate OneDrive support to the Windows cycle for relevant machines. Windows 7 and 8.1 workplace users will have until January 10th, 2023 (the end of extended support for both platforms), while Windows 8 users are already out of luck.

The company wasn’t shy about its reasoning. This will help “focus resources” on newer Windows platforms and technologies, according to OneDrive developers. In other words, Microsoft really wants you to upgrade to Windows 10 or Windows 11.

This isn’t a completely unexpected move. Microsoft has long had trouble persuading some customers to upgrade to newer versions of Windows, to the point where companies and governments would rather pay for special support contracts than update. That hurts Microsoft’s bottom line, of course, but it also poses security risks — WannaCry took advantage of organizations running outdated Windows versions. The new OneDrive policy may push some users to install newer Windows versions even if they’re otherwise happy with an old operating system.

Source: https://www.engadget.com/microsoft-onedrive-windows-7-8-support-end-date-210851189.html?src=rss
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Jon Fingas

How to Use Windows 11 without a Microsoft Account

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While Microsoft aggressively pushes online accounts to first-time Windows users, there are workarounds that allow you to use a local account as your primary account. From installation through updating your Windows device, a local account can help you accomplish pretty much anything an online account does. Follow the guide below to use Windows 11 (or Windows 10) without a Microsoft account.

What Is a Windows 11/10 Local Account?

When installing Windows 11/10 for the first time, you’re asked to create a Microsoft Administrator account for the root user. It has the highest privileges of all other accounts on your device and directly syncs with Microsoft servers as soon as you connect to the Internet.

A local account is very different as it is offline and disconnected from… Read more14856278.gif

Source: https://tracking.feedpress.com/link/12555/14856278/use-windows-without-microsoft-account
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sayak Boral

Android and Windows Can Now Sync Copy and Paste: Here’s How

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You know how Apple lets you copy-paste stuff from your iPhone to your Mac? Yeah, well that feature just arrived for Android and Windows devices. Microsoft SwiftKey’s latest update (7.9.0.5) allows you to sync the clipboard between any Android phone and Windows PC—and you don’t even need to use the annoying Your Phone app.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/102242/android-and-windows-can-now-sync-copy-and-paste-heres-how/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Andrew Heinzman

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