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How to Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting

This wikiHow will teach you how to play a video in a Zoom meeting so all the participants will see and hear it. It’s a particularly useful tool for teachers presenting a video in a lesson. For the best results, you should use the desktop client to screen share your video. Using the mobile app to share video may result in the loss of audio.

[Edit]Steps

  1. Join or host a Zoom meeting. For more information on joining a meeting, refer to How to Join a Zoom Meeting on PC or Mac.
    Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting Step 1.jpg
    • If you want to host the meeting, open the desktop client, log in, and click New Meeting .
  2. Click . It’s a green button centered at the bottom of the application window.
    Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting Step 2.jpg
  3. Check the box next to “Optimize Screen Sharing for Video Clip. When you click this box, the box next to “Share computer sound” checks off too, which will ensure your audience hears the video sound.
    Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting Step 3.jpg
  4. Click a window or application to share. You’ll see all the screens you can share, including your Zoom screen and any tabs and windows you have open in a web browser, like YouTube.[1]
    Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting Step 4.jpg
  5. Click . Once you share the selected screen, the participants in the Zoom meeting will see what you’ve selected.
    Play a Video in a Zoom Meeting Step 5.jpg
    • For example, if you selected a YouTube page in the previous step, the participants in the Zoom meeting will see the YouTube page in your web browser. You can click the full-screen icon in the bottom right corner of the YouTube video to make it full-screen.
    • When you want to stop sharing, click Stop Share at the top of your screen.[2]

[Edit]References

[Edit]Quick Summary

Source: https://www.wikihow.com/Play-a-Video-in-a-Zoom-Meeting
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Facebook’s Portal adds support for Netflix, Zoom and other features

Facebook announced this morning it’s bringing a number of new features and services to its family of Portal devices, including support for Netflix and Zoom. The company will also introduce easier ways to launch Netflix and other video streaming apps via one-touch buttons on its new remote, in addition to expanding its selection of its stories offered through its Story Time feature, adding new ways to use AR effects, and introducing Spanish-language voice control, among other things.

Portal TV, the media device that works with your TV at home, today offers access to a range of streaming services, including Amazon Prime Video, Showtime, and Sling TV. But, until now, one of the most important streaming services — Netflix — had been missing. Facebook says Netflix will now be introduced to Portal TV in all countries where Portal is sold.

It will also introduce a new remote that will include one-touch buttons for launching streaming apps, like Prime Video, Netflix, and its own Facebook Watch. This will ship with new Portal TV devices starting today and will be sold in stores in the coming weeks.

The news of Portal TV’s Netflix integration follows shortly after Amazon’s September announcement that it would support the popular streaming service on its own Amazon Echo Show smart displays, three years after the Echo Show line’s original debut. Google, too, recently added Netflix to its smart display lineup, with support arriving on its Nest Hub and Hub Max earlier this year.

The timing of these updates hint that negotiations with Netflix over smart display integrations had been taking place industry-wide, as Netflix worked to make to make its service available across the various platforms.

Image Credits: Facebook

Facebook will also bring Zoom to its Portal devices for video-calling. Back in August, the communications service had announced its plans to support smart displays, including Echo Show and Google Nest Hub Max, as well as Portal from Facebook.

With Portal support, Zoom users will be able to host a video call with up to 25 people on the screen, while leveraging the device’s high-fidelity sound and its AI-powered Smart Camera for hands-free calling. The support will be adding to Portal Mini, Portal, and Portal+ in all regions where the device is sold.

Image Credits: Facebook

As previously announced at Facebook Connect, the company is also expanding its collection of interactive stories in its Story Time library with more diverse content. New stories include Thank You, Omu!A Kids Book About Belonging, and Grandma’s Purse. Plus, AR features are being added to  Dr. Seuss stories, including Hop on PopMr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?The Foot Book, and There’s a Wocket in my Pocket! These will roll out sometime this fall.

Portal’s AR features are getting an update, too. Users will be able to control AR effects in Photo Booth using their voice and the “Hey Portal” command to send themed cards and take photos and video with AR effects to send to friends and family.

“Hey Portal” will also now work in U.S. Spanish, in addition to English, with more languages expected to come in the future. On-screen text on Portal can be displayed in French, Spanish, Italian, and English, however.

Techcrunch?d=2mJPEYqXBVI Techcrunch?d=7Q72WNTAKBA Techcrunch?d=yIl2AUoC8zA Techcrunch?i=Gp1pa46Typg:WpVe5YOksZY:-BT Techcrunch?i=Gp1pa46Typg:WpVe5YOksZY:D7D Techcrunch?d=qj6IDK7rITs

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/06/facebooks-smart-display-portal-adds-support-for-netflix-zoom-and-other-features/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Sarah Perez

How to Use a Virtual Background in Zoom for Android

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If you’re one of the millions of people that have used Zoom for video conferencing, you know that virtual backgrounds are a big deal. These virtual backgrounds can replace the real background behind you. The Android app can also use this feature, here’s how to do it.

Read This Article on How-To Geek ›

Source: https://www.howtogeek.com/691950/how-to-use-a-virtual-background-in-zoom-for-android/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Joe Fedewa

NatGeo virtual backgrounds released for video chat

Today the folks at National Geographic released a wild collection of virtual backgrounds / wallpapers for students doing video chats for school. Virtual school, remote schooling, remote classroom work is currently more popular than it’s ever been before, thanks to COVID-19 and the likely resurgence of the global pandemic thanks to winter – so National Geographic just stepped up to … Continue reading

Source: https://www.slashgear.com/natgeo-virtual-backgrounds-released-for-video-chat-25639882/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Chris Burns

Zoom’s earliest investors are betting millions on a better Zoom for schools

Zoom was never created to be a consumer product. Nonetheless, the video-conferencing company’s accessibility made it the answer to every social situation threatened by the pandemic, from happy hours to meetings.

Months later, we’re realizing that force-feeding social experiences into an enterprise software company isn’t a perfect solution. Zoom School is a perfect example of what’s not working: Remote education is a hot mess for students, teachers and parents. Instructors, who could once engage a classroom through whiteboard activities, mini-group presentations and one-on-one discussions, are now stuck to one screen.

Well more than six months into a global pandemic, former Blackboard CEO and former PrecisionHawk CEO Michael Chasen is daring to dream: What if we didn’t assume Zoom was a Band-Aid fix for schools? What if someone created a Zoom experience that was designed, not just marketed, for classrooms?

“If I told you that the majority of classes being held online today, teachers couldn’t take attendance, hand out assignments, give a test or a quiz, grade anything or talk one on one with students, you would say how is teaching and learning even happening?” he told TechCrunch.

Chasen is launching a new company, ClassEDU, with a first product that isn’t too shy about its ambitions, named Class for Zoom. Although the name might convince you that it’s a third-party add-on to Zoom, it’s an entirely independently owned company. And it’s built for teachers who need to find a way to create more-engaging, live-synchronous learning.

When a teacher logs into the Zoom call, they’ll be brought to a screen that looks like this:

Image Credits: ClassEDU

As you can see, they can toggle between the classroom, assignments, tests and quizzes, or the whiteboard. Instead of unorganized tab time, the teacher can take the video call as a one-stop shop for their entire lesson, from syncing materials from the CMS system to polling students on their thoughts to grading the quiz they just took. It’s a full-suite solution, and an ambitious one at that.

The best way to break down Class for Zoom’s features is by separating them into two buckets: instruction tools and management tools.

On the instruction side, Class for Zoom helps teachers launch live assignments, quizzes, and tests, which can be completed by students in real time. Students can also be polled to motivate engagement. Instructors can be granted access to unmute a class or mute a class during appropriate times.

Image Credits: ClassEDU

The marquee feature of the instruction tools is that teachers and students can talk privately without leaving the Zoom call if there’s a question. This is key for shy students who might not want to speak up, inspired by Chasen’s daughter, who struggled to share in front of an entire classroom.

Image Credits: ClassEDU

On the management side, tools range from attendance trackers to features that allow a teacher to see how much time a student is participating in activities. Chasen, who founded Blackboard when he was in college, also gave a nod to his prior company by allowing teachers to integrate CMS systems right into the Zoom classroom.

Less popular, Chasen jokes, is Class for Zoom’s ability to give teachers intel on if a student has Zoom as the primary app in use on their screen. The attention-tracking feature is not new, but it is oversight some people might not be okay with. Students can disable the ability to track focus, but administrators can make it mandatory. The platform also allows teachers to monitor a student’s desktop during an exam to limit cheating.

Class for Zoom’s access to a student’s personal computer could make some users uncomfortable. Zoom has been banned from some school districts due to security concerns, and a wave of Zoombombing attacks, where an unwanted participant hacks into a call and streams inappropriate or offensive content. In response, the video conferencing company has put in security measures, such as verification tools and waiting rooms.

Chasen says that Class for Zoom is balancing its access to information by giving students the option to opt into tracking features versus forcing them to.

Class for Zoom isn’t the only startup trying to make Zoom a better experience. A number of tools built atop Zoom have launched in the past few months, partially because the price of Zoom’s SDK is $0. Macro raised $4.3 million to add depth and analysis to Zoom calls, with an interface that tracks metrics like speaker time and notes. It has more than 25,000 users. Mmhmm got buzz in July for its creative demo that lets users create a broadcast-style video-conferencing experience atop their videoconferencing platform of choice.

Somewhat predictably, Zoom launched a competing feature with Mmhmm that calls into question whether the startups that layer atop incumbents look more like features instead of full-fledged platforms.

Of course, one threat to any of these products is Zoom’s mood. If Zoom tweaks its policy on SDK and API, it could completely wipe out Class for Zoom. But Chasen has reason to be optimistic that this won’t happen.

Today, Class for Zoom announced that it has raised a $16 million seed round, pre-launch, from a cohort of investors, including some of Zoom’s earliest backers such as Santi Subotovsky, a current Zoom board member from Emergence Capital; Jim Scheinman of Maven Partners, an early investor in Zoom and the person who is credited with naming Zoom; and Bill Tai, who is Zoom’s first committed backer. Other investors include Deborah Quazzo, partner from GSV Ventures, and Steve Case, co-founder of AOL and CEO of Revolution.

When asked if the Zoom investor involvement works as “insurance” to protect the startup, Chasen said he didn’t view it like that. Instead, the founder thinks that Zoom is focused more on scale than in-depth specialization. In other words, Zoom isn’t going to pull a Twitter, but instead likens the platform’s developer friendliness to that of Salesforce, which has tons of tools built atop of it. Second, Class for Zoom is a certified Zoom reseller, and makes money off of commission when a district buys Zoom through them. The informal and formal partnerships are enough glue, it seems, for Chasen to bet on stability.

As for whether the technology will stay exclusive to Zoom, Chasen says that it’s the main focus because Zoom is the “de facto industry standard in education.” If other platforms pick up speed, Chasen says they are open to experimenting with different software.

Chasen declined to share exact numbers around pricing, but said that it is a work in progress to find a price point that districts can afford. It’s unclear whether the company will charge per seat, but the founder said that it will charge some type of subscription service fee.

Accessibility in edtech solutions often relies on the medium that the technology and instruction lives on. For example, even if a product is free to use, if it needs high-speed internet and a Mac to work then it might not be accessible to the average home in America. The digital divide is why products often test usability on Chromebooks, low-cost computers that low-income students, teachers and school districts employ.

In Class for Zoom’s case, the first iteration of the product is being rolled out for teachers with Macintosh computers, which could leave out some key demographics due to expense. It’s worth noting that while students can still participate in a class being run on Class for Zoom without the software, the view, tracking and engagement software will be missing.

Thankfully, the new financing will be used to help ClassEDU build software that is usable on low-cost computers such as Chromebooks, as well as Windows, Android or iPhones. When that happens, teachers and students can both benefit from a more engaging view.

Chasen said that the idea for the startup began brewing just weeks into quarantine, when his three kids began learning from home. Months later, Class for Zoom is finally set to launch its beta version and is opening up its waitlist today. By January, Chasen hopes, it will be accessible to any school that wants it.

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Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/09/23/class-for-zoom-earliest-investors-are-betting-millions/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Natasha Mascarenhas

Zoom Users Can Now Secure Accounts with Two-Factor Authenticatoin

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One of the beneficiaries of the global pandemic is, without a doubt, video conferencing companies. Zoom has seen its business skyrocket as more and more people work from home, and with that came security scrutiny. The company hasn’t been resting on its laurels, though, and now it’s introducing two-factor authentication (2FA) for your accounts.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/53603/zoom-users-can-now-secure-accounts-with-two-factor-authenticatoin/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

Facebook Updates Messenger Rooms With Custom Backgrounds and Easier Access

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When Facebook unveiled Messenger Rooms last May, it spent a lot of time focusing on making it easy to get to without the Messenger app. Now, the company is improving upon Messenger Rooms when you do have the Messenger app, including adding custom background options and a new interface.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/51941/facebook-updates-messenger-rooms-with-custom-backgrounds-and-easier-access/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

Zoom Arrives on Google, Echo, and Portal Smart Displays

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Now that Work From Home is becoming the new normal, video conference from home is the new regular work meeting. But webcams are hard to come by, and so are decent microphones. What if you could use your smart display? If you’re a Zoom user, chances are now you can, whether it’s a Googe, Echo, or Portal device.

Read This Article on Review Geek ›

Source: https://www.reviewgeek.com/51084/zoom-arrives-on-google-echo-and-portal-smart-displays/
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The Article Was Written/Published By: Josh Hendrickson

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